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white girl weed

Urban Thesaurus finds slang words that are related to your search query.

Due to the way the algorithm works, the thesaurus gives you mostly related slang words, rather than exact synonyms. The higher the terms are in the list, the more likely that they’re relevant to the word or phrase that you searched for. The search algorithm handles phrases and strings of words quite well, so for example if you want words that are related to lol and rofl you can type in lol rofl and it should give you a pile of related slang terms. Or you might try boyfriend or girlfriend to get words that can mean either one of these (e.g. bae). Please also note that due to the nature of the internet (and especially UD), there will often be many terrible and offensive terms in the results.
As you’ve probably noticed, the slang synonyms for ” term ” are listed above. Note that due to the nature of the algorithm, some results returned by your query may only be concepts, ideas or words that are related to ” term ” (perhaps tenuously). This is simply due to the way the search algorithm works.

The Urban Thesaurus was created by indexing millions of different slang terms which are defined on sites like Urban Dictionary. These indexes are then used to find usage correlations between slang terms. The official Urban Dictionary API is used to show the hover-definitions. Note that this thesaurus is not in any way affiliated with Urban Dictionary.
Click words for definitions
There is still lots of work to be done to get this slang thesaurus to give consistently good results, but I think it’s at the stage where it could be useful to people, which is why I released it.
You might also have noticed that many of the synonyms or related slang words are racist/sexist/offensive/downright appalling – that’s mostly thanks to the lovely community over at Urban Dictionary (not affiliated with Urban Thesaurus). Urban Thesaurus crawls the web and collects millions of different slang terms, many of which come from UD and turn out to be really terrible and insensitive (this is the nature of urban slang, I suppose). Hopefully the related words and synonyms for ” term ” are a little tamer than average.
Special thanks to the contributors of the open-source code that was used in this project: @krisk, @HubSpot, and @mongodb.

Finally, you might like to check out the growing collection of curated slang words for different topics over at Slangpedia.

Urban Thesaurus Urban Thesaurus finds slang words that are related to your search query. Click words for definitions Popular Slang Searches Slang for As you’ve probably noticed,

Missy Elliott , no matter that she’s one of the greatest hustlers of our time , is still remembered for Passing that Dutch. Rihanna’s marijuana use, obsessively catalogued by fans, is referred to by media outlets as part of a party-girl behavior that’s unhinged . In other words: Everyone loves the lady-stoner, just as long as she’s white.

Alanna Vanacore, a 28-year-old white visual artist who lives in Brooklyn, is of this breed. She’s used marijuana for more than 10 years in some capacity. A clean, platinum bob sprouts from the top of her head, framing her face—not a mass of oily, matted hair. She says she smokes or uses a vaporizer a few times a week, usually to prep for painting or to deal with anxiety. She sleeps under a luxurious feather down comforter, tucked in an immaculate white slip. She doesn’t own one piece of tie-dyed clothing. The woman hustles, too, working a part-time administrative job in addition to selling her own work and producing shows to help peddle it.
On one hand, the feminization of weed can be seen as empowering—stripping the culture of its once hyper-masculine, Cheech & Chong presumptions. But there’s an inherent whiteness to this new breed . Although the state of New York still deems marijuana largely illegal , Vanacore and the girls in “Broad City” don’t run a huge risk carrying a spliff’s worth of herb or less. Almost two years ago, the New York Police Department adopted a new policy that limited low-level marijuana charges to writing tickets. But more importantly, as the American Civil Liberties Union has found, black people are almost four times more likely than white people to be arrested for marijuana possession. So even as weed-smoking becomes a casual, female activity, the question of who gets to visibly participate in the culture still often breaks down along racial lines.

The paranoia from smoking too much weed mixed with a legit, standing fear for her safety in a systemically oppressive legal system, Ashley says, felt debilitating. She added that if they’d ever gotten in trouble for marijuana, her roommate’s parents could easily bail her out; Ashley, however, would be stuck to clean up her own mess.
There isn’t much in the way of an official census in regards to how many women in the U.S. use marijuana now, before, or ever, really. But if recent, frenzied media coverage (and legislative changes) are any indication, more and more women are sparking up. A boyfriend or male companion isn’t imperative to the equation. Instead, I’ve noticed more women around me attaining their own herb, and as their profile is growing they’re getting their own Instagram-ready products, too, like cutesy printed rolling papers and gold-dipped one-hitters.
When “Broad City” emerged in 2014, it was lauded in part because characters Abbi and Ilana smoked weed frequently, but in a functioning way. It showed marijuana’s growth in one corner of society, where young white women held down jobs and personal relationships, getting high often without completely going up in smoke.
Her tone is glib, though she is clearly educated. She flexes a strong hashtag game, an eye for minimalist design. She is a beginner at reading tarot. She has opinions about Drake’s new album Views. She can paint a perfect cat-eye while high as fuck. She doesn’t fit the mold of the 1990s-era Spencers Gifts pothead, or the one the War on Drugs invented. She is a newish human iteration: She’s the beta stoner.
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But Ashley (not her real name), a 24-year-old black woman in Atlanta, says in part it’s her race that keeps her quiet about her marijuana use and fuels her wishes to remain anonymous in this piece. Her Ghanaian immigrant parents and their staunch expectations also have something to do with it, too. “The first person I actually smoked with was my [older] brother,” she says, who was in college at Emory at the time.

Her tone is glib, though she is clearly educated. She flexes a strong hashtag game, an eye for minimalist design. She is a beginner at reading tarot. She has opinions about Drake’s new album Views. She can paint a perfect cat-eye while high as fuck. She doesn’t fit the mold of the 1990s-era Spencers Gifts pothead, or the one the War on Drugs invented. She is a newish human iteration: She’s the beta stoner.