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what causes cannabis to turn purple in color?

When cannabis presents as purple, we are seeing a similar phenomenon as fall leaves, allowing purple bud to have a wide spectrum as well. Like other plants for cannabis, colors, and changes in color, have purpose. The stressed plant is changing pigment in order to achieve a goal before wilting in the cold, such as conserving energy or increasing chances for pollination.

This can be a bit linguistically confusing; a blue-named class of molecules that presents as red or purple is a subset of a class of yellow-named molecules. It begins to make sense when we consider that a complex interaction of anthocyanins and other flavonoids is what causes leaves to change their color among such a brilliant spectrum in the fall.
Furthermore, no one is wrong to feel that the visual appeal of a flower can enhance the smoking experience. However, ultimately, the mere presence of the pigment is unrelated to the resulting effects. If the flower is good, by all means smoke it, in any spectrum of the rainbow.

Visual appeal aside, is there reason to believe that these royal-toned flowers are better than the green hues more common to the plant? The science leans towards no.
In speaking with growers, budtenders, flower reviewers and other cannabis journalists, the consensus among the industry is to treat each harvest as unique–smoke what appeals to you. If the effects of purple strain are appealing, go for it.
Purple cannabis can be a tricky concept. Just stop for a moment and contemplate the timeless line, “roses are red, violets are blue.” A modern sensibility would correct that the color of violets is none other than violet. Similarly, purple weed is not always “purple.” It can have a wide range of presentation, from dark green to even black.
Anything beyond breeding could detriment the plant. “Any energy the plant spends pushing out that purple pigment is going to be drawn from somewhere else and is going to hurt overall. It’s just not worth risking the quality for a chance a slightly better bag appeal.”
In general, purple bud has a tendency for lower THC content than its greener counterparts. That’s not to say high-THC purple is not possible, we’re sure we’ve all seen or smoked an exception to the rule. That is because most purple bud that we see today is not a result of stressing the plant, but genetics.

What are your thoughts on purple weed? Do you find it to be better than green cannabis?

Everyone cannabis enthusiast has a place in their heart for purple weed. Learn about why cannabis turns purple and some of the truths and myths behind it.

What causes cannabis to turn purple in color?

Remember, the two main factors affecting the colour of your cannabis plants are genetics and temperature. If you’re really set on growing purple weed, make sure to invest in the right genetics from the get-go.

Genetics are going to have the biggest impact on the final colour of your plants. So, if you’re set on growing purple weed, shop around for purple strains, as they’ll have been specifically bred for their unique colour. Remember that your buds are going to lose some colour after trimming, so opt for strains with the most vibrant purple pigmentation you can find.
While you might be eager to watch your plants turn purple, this will usually only happen once they’ve finished vegetative growth and start flowering. Once your plants have entered their flowering stage, try dropping your nighttime temperatures. Colder temperatures cause chlorophyll to break down and can encourage your plants to produce more anthocyanins. Ideally, you’ll want there to be a difference of 10–15°C between your daytime and nighttime temperatures.

Purple weed is real eye candy. And while there are many rumours circulating the internet about how to grow purple cannabis at home, there are really only two variables that you can play with to manipulate the colour of your weed. Keep reading to find out what they are.
Purple Queen is an almost pure indica variety bred from Hindu Kush and Purple Afghani genetics. She flowers over 9–11 weeks and produces big, purple buds with a uniquely pungent aroma that combines hints of both pine and fuel. Purple Queen also boasts a THC concentration of up to 22% and produces a nice, relaxing body stone that’s perfect for whenever you need to unwind and relax.
There are some other ways to manipulate the colour of your plants. Most of these techniques, however, involve depriving your plants of certain nutrients, which, of course, we do not recommend doing. Even if you are able to achieve some purple colouration using these alternative methods, it will likely be to the detriment of quality, flavour, and potency.
• Trichomes: Trichomes are the tiny crystals that cover your buds. While they usually start off clear and become opaque and then amber later on, it is possible for them to turn purple, too.
Some growers also use food colouring to dye their plants. And while it might work, we definitely do not recommend trying it. Finally, changing your plant’s light cycle, watering schedule, or grow medium also won’t increase its chances of turning purple, nor will yelling, screaming, or singing to your plants.

Hence, purple cannabis plants (or any purple plant for that matter) get their colour because the dominant pigment in their leaves and flowers are anthocyanins, rather than chlorophyll.

Perhaps you've seen brilliant purple bud. Perhaps you've even accidentally grown it. Now, you'd like to do it on purpose. Here is the ultimate guide to making your bud glow with that unique purple hue.