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thc tolerance

O ver time, cannabis consumers develop a tolerance to cannabis, making the effects of marijuana diminished to a certain degree. This happens to just about anyone who consumes frequently enough. As you consume more cannabis, your brain needs more THC to produce the desired effects you seek. This is due to the diminished effects that occur when THC cannabinoids bind with the body’s CB1 receptors.
All in all, finding your ideal tolerance break duration might take a little trial and error. Once you dial it in however, you should see noticeable results and feel stronger effects from your normal cannabis consumption habits.
While consuming CBD seems to have its supporters, some caution that full spectrum and distillate products can still contain trace amounts of THC. If a person wants to altogether avoid THC when consuming, they might want to look into an isolate for pure CBD or a distillate that is void of any THC traces.
There are numerous tips and tricks to succeeding with a tolerance break. Depending on who you ask, you may find yourself taking up new activities. Often, you are recommended to toss your stash. Some might suggest discussing your break with your cannabis community so no one will tempt you.
The rise of CBD is the cannabis community inevitably found its ways into the tolerance break discussion as well. While not a hot topic of discussion in comparison to other subjects with the cannabis community online, some have weighed in on the matter. In most cases, they suggest that CBD is adequate, if not recommended, during a break.
A self-imposed tolerance break can last as long as you see fit. That is, considering the amount you consume. In an ideal scenario, you’d take a day off and that half ounce a day tolerance would be gone, right? That isn’t the case, unfortunately. So, there is some adherence to your body and how much you’ve consumed as of late.
Tolerance breaks serve a purpose in two scenarios. In one case, they can be self-imposed. The other may be out of one’s control and instead be a necessity for the moment – such as a Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak.
Acknowledging that a break is trying on the individual, the guide aims to help people push through the adversity of a cannabis pause so they can re-evaluate themselves. Each week focuses on a theme with daily practices. The first week centers on the physical, ranging from preparation to our routines. The second week delves into the emotional, ranging from withdrawal to a person’s creativity. Lastly, the final week explores spiritual and existential themes, from crediting yourself, not the substance, to what comes after the break is completed.
Others offered similar sentiments in regards to the non-psychoactive benefits of the cannabinoid. In several cases, consumers self-reported feeling calmer, while others say CBD helped when desires to consume THC came on.
Considering taking a tolerance break from cannabis? Learn more about how long a proper marijuana tolerance break should be, as well as helpful tips to guide you through the process.
Similarly, there are proteins in the cell that act like the coach to detect weak receptors and pull them from the game. Desensitized CB1 receptors are detected by components within the cell that tag the receptor with a phosphate group. This is like the pitcher telling the coach to take them out of the game. This phosphate group signals to additional components within the cell to remove the receptor from the cell’s surface. At this point, both the pitcher and the CB1 receptor are no longer active players.
Mice who were given twice daily injections of THC at 10 mg/kg developed tolerance to THC’s pain-relieving and sedative effects after 36 hours (i.e., 3 THC injections). Tolerance to THC’s sedative effects were stronger than to its pain-relieving effects, suggesting that different brain regions or brain cells are more susceptible to tolerance than others.
But here’s the thing: if you stop, the brain can recover. And it does so impressively quickly, generally within weeks.
Since internalization of CB1 receptors is the predominant consequence of excessive THC consumption, it helps explain why there’s faster brain recovery with cannabis abstinence than many other drugs of abuse. At worst, CB1 receptors become internalized and broken down, in which case they must be reproduced and sent back up to the cell’s surface to recover normal brain function (it should be noted that there can be additional repercussions with substantial use on other brain chemical systems).
A study of daily cannabis users reported that users had reduced CB1 receptors compared to non-users, which increased to around-normal after just two weeks of abstinence. Importantly, this study didn’t assess whether CB1 receptors remained desensitized. However, additional studies demonstrated that withdrawal is more intense when there are fewer available CB1 receptors for THC to bind, suggesting that tolerance is indeed the internalization of CB1 receptors.
THC causes tolerance through repeated activation of CB1 receptors. Repeated activation of CB1 receptors initiates events inside the brain cell that at first leads to desensitization, which is the weakening of the response to THC, followed by internalization, which is the removal of CB1 receptors from the cell’s surface. You’ll be able to detect when these processes occur because you’ll need to consume more THC to get high.
The activation of CB1 receptors by THC initiates these processes. As CB1 receptors get frequently activated, they become less associated with the components that carry out the receptors effects. CB1 receptors are like a baseball pitcher who throws a lot of pitches. Eventually, the pitcher’s muscles can’t carry out the task of throwing the ball as hard as it once could. This weakening strength is observed by the coach who then pulls the pitcher out of the game.
If you’re a regular cannabis user, how quickly you become tolerant to THC (which reflects CB1 receptor internalization) depends on the dose and frequency you consume, your use history, and your DNA. Obviously, these factors vary greatly across individuals, so our best understanding of the time course for tolerance development comes from studies in mice.
Compared to other recreational drugs, cannabis is unique in the speed at which the brain “recovers” following a period of abstinence. Recovery is notably difficult to measure, but we can look at changes in behavior, brain function, and brain chemical receptor levels as a proxy.
Learn about how THC tolerance develops and why your tolerance to cannabis recovers quickly once you take a break.