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sprouting seeds vs regular seeds

I’m starting to acquire seeds for sprouting and notice the price difference is astronomical vs. regular seeds (organically grown or not). But the price would seem worth it if: the germination rate is much better; the seeds are untreated; and the supplier has picked for you which variety is best for sprouts (not leaving it to chance).

Old Git: I just acquired “Biosta” sprouters, in which the directions say to rinse 1x/day for large seeds (beans) and less often for smaller seeds. Musta lucked out here. I do like the design, it’s a round, triple-decker sort of “sprout hotel”. We are going to have to get very creative with water.
Just for the record, here are some other sites for sprouts

During Y2K many people will have bad health from eating nothing but cannned food! If you value your health, buy these four items and also sprouting seeds. A handfull of sprouts a day, keep the doctors away. You MUST keep your health a #1 priority during Y2K.
Otherwise. Johnny’;s had sprouting seeds, and they seemed reasonable,

Seem to hear good things about Bob’s Red Mill all the time, so I ordered a catalog!

Bob’s Red Mill is the best place to get sprouting seeds. Go there frequently, excellent product and service. Green peas, alfalfa, sunflower, triticale, quinoa, baby lentil, mung, adzuki, soybeans, kamut, etc.

Bingo: Right you are, Sproutpeople has an amazing selection (every web page says “Eat Sprouts. ” in case you forgot why you went there) and for most comparisons I did, the best prices in quantity. Next best prices, Johnny’s. Sooo. to distill the wisdom here, what I will do is to get mostly the “sprouting seeds” but try sprouting others too, as long as organically grown and meant for food, not growing. If a batch does well then I’ll stock up more of it.

Wow I never thought about sprouting quinoa. cool! How about amaranth?

Sprouting seeds vs regular seeds I’m starting to acquire seeds for sprouting and notice the price difference is astronomical vs. regular seeds (organically grown or not). But the price would

Sprouting seeds vs regular seeds

“It’s the baby version of the mature vegetable, of course.”

To sum it up, here are the differences between microgreens and sprouts:
The “cotyledon” usually becomes the plants’ first set of leaves. They’re formed in the seed, and function in the same way as leaves do when it comes to photosynthesis—both convert light energy into chemical energy that the plant will use to grow.

Another difference is that microgreens and sprouts are technically at different parts of the growing cycle of any given vegetable/herb.
Microgreens, contrary to very popular belief, are not the same things as sprouts. In fact, not only do they look and taste different, but even the way in which they are grown is different.
“They’re really pretty, decorative plants!”
Microgreens shouldn’t be confused with baby greens. Baby greens don’t really fit into any growing stage in particular; they’re the leafy plants that are harvested before they’re really, truly mature.
Microgreens are the result of the cotyledon growth stage, which is when the first couple of leaves from a plant appear.

If you let a sprouting seed grow, then it eventually becomes a full-grown plant. But until then, what you have are crunchy, refreshing sprouts.

Microgreens and sprouts look and taste different. Even the way in which they are grown is different. Learn the difference between microgreens and sprouts.