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sour flower plant

Sour flower plant

ewan/pdf/oxalis.pdf.

  • the Tamar Valley Weed Strategy website page on oxalis species at http://www.weeds.asn.au.
  • Click on images to enlarge
    young plant (Photo: Sheldon Navie)

    flowers (Photo: Sheldon Navie)
    Fact sheets are available from Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation (DEEDI) service centres and our Customer Service Centre (telephone 13 25 23). Check our website at www.biosecurity.qld.gov.au to ensure you have the latest version of this fact sheet. The control methods referred to in this fact sheet should be used in accordance with the restrictions (federal and state legislation, and local government laws) directly or indirectly related to each control method. These restrictions may prevent the use of one or more of the methods referred to, depending on individual circumstances. While every care is taken to ensure the accuracy of this information, DEEDI does not invite reliance upon it, nor accept responsibility for any loss or damage caused by actions based on it.
    Soursob ( Oxalis pes-caprae ) is very similar to Oxalis compressa and relatively similar to creeping oxalis ( Oxalis corniculata ) and pink bulb soursob ( Oxalis flava ). These species can be distinguished by the following differences:
    Native to southern Africa (i.e. South Africa and Namibia).


      the Environmental Weeds Action Network (EWAN) brochure on oxalis species, which is available online at http://members.iinet.net.au/

    • New South Wales: Class 5 – a restricted weed which must not be sold, bought or knowingly distributed (throughout the entire state).
    • South Australia: 3* – declared in Class 3, a designation for agricultural weeds. This species is required to be controlled in part of the state only.
    • Victoria: C2 – all reasonable steps must be taken to control this species and prevent its spread (in the Glenelg and Corangamite regions).
    • Western Australia: Prohibited – on the prohibited species list and not permitted entry into the state.

    Weeds of Australia – Biosecurity Queensland Edition Fact Sheet Top Click on images to enlarge large infestation (Photo: Sheldon Navie)

    Sour flower plant

    Looking around for his mom, Patrick handed me a long-stemmed, yellow flower. We were in the narrow patch of yard between the junipers and the brick retaining wall. The offer seemed sneaky, maybe even bad. I was six. Sneaky, maybe even bad things were irresistible.

    I tasted. The spaghetti-thin stem crunched. The flesh inside was sour as hell. Too sour. My eyes watered. We ate handfuls.
    Trim the roots and flowers off of the flower stalks. Rinse throughly and chop into inch-long chunks.

    1 tablespoon honey
    2 pints of water
    1 fistful of Oxalis stricta flower stalks
    You’ve seen Wood Sorrel a thousand times and thought nothing of it. It looks a bit like a three-leafed clover and shoots up tall, thin stalks topped with soft, yellow flowers. It grows on footpaths and by sidewalks. Foragers make a sort of lemonade from it. Hikers munch the leaves as a thirst quencher. Nature’s Gatorade.
    I’d spend the rest of my youth exploring the world with all five senses. Growing up on the beaches and in the mountains of San Diego county, my options were many.

    Sourgrass was first.

    Looking around for his mom, Patrick handed me a long-stemmed, yellow flower. We were in the narrow patch of yard between the junipers and the brick retaining wall. The offer seemed sneaky, maybe even…