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sending weed through the mail

If it ever becomes advantageous to use that information at a later time, they can. Statutes of limitations will vary from state to state, but are generally longer for drug trafficking than drug possession. The current limit in California is five years from the date of the incident, just to give you an idea. One postal agent who spoke to me on the condition of anonymity put it simply, “We know. We always know. It’s either not worth the time, or we’re waiting for the right time.” Usually, after first being detected, they start to watch your activity and wait to see if there’s a larger charge to prosecute you for while you continue to send packages under a false sense of security, continuing to incriminate yourself.
If that’s not enough to convince you that mailing weed is a bad idea, we’ll break it down even further to specifically highlight the main reasons why sending cannabis via the mail is something no cannabis consumer should ever consider.
Do you have anything to add to why mailing cannabis is a bad idea? Share your thoughts below!
In many legalized states, workers have to be licensed in order to be allowed to work in the marijuana industry, and the determination of that licensing is largely based on past criminal record, especially in relation to cannabis. Most consider having a clean criminal record the only requirement for holding a badge, so sending a package means effectively risking that possibility.
Without question, a lot of pot isn’t winding up at its destination, and your package is likely to be part of it. After it doesn’t arrive, you’ll get to play the fun waiting game of wondering if you’re going to be charged for it or not. Which, doesn’t always happen the way you’d expect…
Cannabis is still federally illegal and considered a schedule 1 drug, meaning that sending it through the mail amounts to trafficking. According to the DEA’s 2017 ominously titled “Drugs of Abuse” report, the most minimal of offenses possible (anything under 50kg of product, or 1-49 plants) is punishable by up to five years jail time and a fine of $250,000.
T here are few government agencies with their own memorable children’s song, but sing the first few notes to, “here’s the mail, it never fails…” and any member of a certain generation of American youth is likely to give the full song in response. The American affinity for the US postal service is so extensive it even spawned multiple major motion pictures. However, the nation’s growing acceptance for legal cannabis is at odds with our affinity for shipping things – making the mail system off limits for marijuana businesses or consumers.
Monday September 17, 2018
It’s probably the least of one’s concerns, but it’s still a huge bummer. Though prices are constantly falling, cannabis still costs money. Even if nothing legal happens, the product is likely to be confiscated. Every year, the DEA publishes data on the amount of seized cannabis. In 2017, the record was broken for cannabis seized leaving Colorado through the mail, and it became so problematic in Oregon that its US Attorney issued an editorial about how overproduction was driving the black market. He stated, “In 2017 alone, postal agents in Oregon seized 2,644 pounds of marijuana in outbound parcels. ”
Mailing cannabis is a serious offense and can leave you with some pretty hefty consequences if you're caught. Learn more about why mailing marijuana is never a good idea and some of the steep ramifications that you could face if caught.
Cannabis has been legal to varying degrees at the state levels since the 1990s, when California first approved medical cannabis. But even after Colorado and Washington state launched America’s first recreational or adult-use cannabis sales, the USPS forbade mailing any cannabis products through the postal system in accordance with federal law.
New guidelines from the USPS reveal that the federal agency will now ship and deliver hemp. But you still should think twice before sending some dank to your buddy out in South Dakota.
Despite the USPS’s ban, people kept sending weed through the postal system. In 2017, the agency discovered over 900 packages containing weed in Colorado alone.
Hemp is a form of cannabis that contains negligible amounts of THC, so it won’t get anyone buzzed. In recent years, its cultivation has grown popular in the US for extracting CBD, a non-intoxicating compound with medicinal properties.
Of course, the US government won’t make mailing weed products easy. First, to ship hemp or hemp products through the USPS, mailers must fill out a form confirming they are sending hemp and only hemp. Lying on the self-certification statement could subject the mailer to federal perjury laws.
New guidelines from the US Postal Service reveal the federal agency will now ship and deliver some cannabis products. Specifically, hemp products.
New guidelines from the USPS reveal that the federal agency will now ship and deliver hemp. But you still should think twice before sending some dank to your buddy out in South Dakota.
As first reported by Kight on Cannabis, the USPS “quietly released” the memo earlier this month. The letter cites the 2014 and 2018 Farm Bills, which federally permitted and expanded hemp cultivation throughout the US in states that legalized weed. The guidelines state the USPS will only handle cannabis products made from hemp that contains less than 0.3 percent THC.
Second, only licensed industrial hemp producers can mail hemp products. So, think twice before sending some dank shatter hash to your buddy out in South Dakota.
New guidelines from the USPS reveal that the federal agency will now ship and deliver hemp. But you still should think twice before sending some dank to your buddy out in South Dakota.