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purple weed name

Purple weed name

And whether a plant’s leaves turn red, or yellow, or orange, or purple is largely determined by its genetics. A plant’s genetics determines how much of one flavonoid or the other is present. So trying to force a marijuana plant to turn purple won’t work unless the traits are already there.

With parents like Sour Diesel and Granddaddy Purple, it just has to be good.
Most of the hype surrounding purple weed is strictly novelty. In reality, purple weed isn’t much different than green weed or multi-colored weed (e.g., Fruity Pebbles). Any extra benefits cannabis consumers claim to get from purple weed is more likely due to altered perceptions (no pun intended) or the strain itself. It doesn’t have to do with the color.

Like oxygen, carbon dioxide is necessary for the healthy growth of most plants. A marijuana plant that is deprived of carbon dioxide won’t develop correctly. Carbon dioxide deprivation of marijuana is only a recipe for unhealthy weed, not for turning it purple marijuana plant that is deprived of carbon dioxide won’t develop correctly. Carbon dioxide deprivation of marijuana is only a recipe for unhealthy weed, not for turning it purple.
And really that’s just common sense. Depriving a plant (or any living thing) of the essential ingredients it needs to grow will only make it unhealthy.
Purple weed seems to be the holy grail that everyone is searching for these days. And they’re doing all kinds of crazy things to get it. But is there really any extra benefit to the purple hue, or is it all just bunk? And is it even possible to produce the coveted purple color by giving the plant something extra, taking something away, or tweaking the conditions in which the weed is grown?
Two important factors determine whether weed can, and will, turn purple during its growing cycle: genetics and temperature. Here’s how they work.
Myths about purple weed abound. Most of those myths revolve around how the famous purple hue is achieved when growing marijuana. The most common myths include:

In the fall then, when chlorophyll breaks down, the anthocyanin (and other flavonoids) are no longer overpowered by the green. This results in the beautiful yellows, reds, oranges, and even purples that signal the approach of winter.

Purple weed seems to be the holy grail that everyone is searching for these days. But is there really any extra benefit to the purple hue? Let's find out.