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purple hair weed

Purple hair weed

Flavonoids are a class of plant pigments. The pigments work in combination with other chemicals to give plants their distinctive, and varied color. Common flavonoids include quercetin, carotenoid, and kaempferol. Flavonoids get their name from the Latin “flavus” (yellow) because they generally appear yellow in appearance. Contrary to how the word looks, flavonoids have nothing to do with flavor.

Source: TheChillBud.com
This one doesn’t work to turn your marijuana purple either. Plants need a certain amount of light each day to stay healthy. If you mess with that process, you’re just going to get unhealthy plants, not purple ones.

Let’s look at each one in turn.
Source: TheChillBud.com
Remember from our discussion about flavonoids and anthocyanin that it’s the presence of the latter that determines if purple is even possible. If a strain’s genetics contain carotenoid instead of anthocyanin, the color will be more on the yellow side. Nothing you can do will change that. It’s like planting a tomato plant and then trying to make it produce kiwi. It’s just not going to work.
During the majority of the growing season, anthocyanin is overpowered by the stronger, greener chlorophyll. That’s why most plants are green in the spring and summer: the chlorophyll is more prevalent. And this isn’t just happenstance. The green color actually serves a purpose—it captures more solar energy than other colors.
Source: TheChillBud.com

Source: TheChillBud.com

Purple weed seems to be the holy grail that everyone is searching for these days. But is there really any extra benefit to the purple hue? Let's find out.