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proper drying and curing

Proper drying and curing

Get the answers to 9 of the most frequently asked questions about drying and curing cannabis.

During this check-up, keep your jars open to allow for air exchange, and inspect each bud individually for signs of mould. If you find an infected bud, make sure to remove it from its jar immediately to avoid the fungus spreading.
In order for your buds to dry evenly, you’ll want to ensure that air can move freely, coming into contact with them on all sides. The best way to do this is to string up your cut and trimmed branches, or to use wire racks if you’re working with individual buds or small branches. If you choose to use racks, keep in mind that you’ll need to flip your buds regularly to ensure they don’t flatten on one side.

Ahhh, harvest time. After watching your ladies grow and flower, it’s finally time to collect your hard-earned buds. But before you can enjoy a toke of some homegrown Kush, you’ll need to dry and cure your freshly harvested weed. Below, we’ll share our answers to some frequently asked questions on the drying and curing process, so you can maximise the flavour and potency of your stash.
Drying, as the name suggests, involves drying fresh buds so they contain less moisture and can be smoked or vaporized properly. Curing, on the other hand, involves storing your buds in closed containers over a period of at least two weeks. This helps develop the flavour and aroma of your buds as they mature.
In general, the drying stage takes about 7–12 days, depending on the above factors. During this time, your buds will lose a lot of water, meaning they’ll shrink in size and lose a lot of weight, too.
This process of consistently checking in on your buds will pull excess moisture out of your jars and allow fresh air to hit your buds. After about two weeks, you can start enjoying your harvested weed, but the longer you wait, the better.
Once your buds are dry and trimmed, place them in big, wide-mouthed jars (mason or jam jars work great). Fill the jars about ¾ of the way so there’s room for additional air, and to reduce the risk of mould or mildew ruining your harvest. Once you’ve filled up your jars, store them in a dry, dark environment (like a kitchen cupboard) and check on your buds at least once per day for two weeks.

There’s a simple test to know if your buds are dry: Simply take a small branch and try to bend it. If it snaps, your buds are dry and you’re ready to move on to the curing process. If they bend, your buds need a little longer to dry.

Properly drying and curing your fresh cannabis harvest is essential to decrease the risk of mould, and to enhance the taste and high that your buds offer.

Take off the fan leaves and trim the bigger sugar leaves. You can do this with a pair of spring-loaded trimming scissors that you can pick up for $10 bucks. In the end, your buds should look like this:

Of course, you can cure your buds for 6 months if you want to, but I think it’s better to keep things optimal.
There are lots of variables that go into creating a bountiful plant, not to mention that it takes months just to go from a seed to a fully flowering plant.

By drying and curing our weed we are essentially doing two things:
You’ve spent months nurturing your herb and now that you’ve harvested it you simply can’t wait to sample the fruits of your labor.
In my experience, the entire drying and curing process should last for 2 months, more or less depending on the strain and the potency you’re going after.
And that’s it! Weapons free from here but be sure to remember this:
Drying and curing should be a slow and tedious process, because that is the only approach that will give you the best possible potency, smell and taste.

Another point to consider is the optimal time frame you’re going to dedicate to this.

Find out what is the best way to dry weed and get one step closer to the highest possible quality buds. Weed curing guide included.