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marijuana drying time

Marijuana drying time
For those who struggle with curing even after going through all the steps in this curing tutorial, there’s a product known as a “Boveda 62” humidipaks which can help maintain the correct humidity in your jars. These are especially helpful at preventing the humidity from getting too low, even if the humidity is very low where you live. Some growers choose to use these every time they jar their buds to maintain the humidity in the 62% range.
This improves the appearance of your buds, and will provide a smoother experience. Too much leafy matter can make buds more harsh.
Note: Boveda is trying to move away from the term “humidipak” these days for some reason, but it’s such a perfect name!
Gets rid of the unpleasant “fresh hay” or “cut grass” smell which is common on newly harvested buds
If you pull down your buds before the smallest stems snap, you’ll find they tend to be too wet once you put them in jars, so you’ll end up having to dry them more anyway. But if you can find a stem that snaps, it’s better to take buds down too early since it’s a lot easier to take water away than add it back.
When buds are finished drying, you’ll be able to snap off the smallest buds with your fingers without leaving a “string” of plant behind. “Stringiness” means there’s still too much moisture inside.
Here’s what drying and curing cannabis properly does for you…
Buds are not wet, but also not brittle – You’re in the cure zone! Your buds may feel a bit sticky to your fingers. Buds should move independently and not clump together in big bunches when you shake the jars.
Note: This article covers the tried-and-true steps for traditional curing. This is the most used and well-studied way to cure your buds. However, there are other possible methods including water curing which I personally don’t have any experience with.
This tutorial teaches you the best way to dry and cure cannabis buds after harvest, which greatly increases bud quality. Quality drying/curing ensures the best smelling, most dense and highest potency marijuana buds!
Important tips for curing weed:
Avoid zip-lock, plastic bags and other alternative methods of curing that you might have read about online. Wide mouth mason jars work the best. Make sure to leave some room for the buds to breathe.
Of course, like everything else related to producing top quality weed, it all comes down to expertise. You’ll need to harvest, dry and cure your weed a couple of times before you learn all the little ins and outs.
Once you’re done with drying and curing, your bud will go from 80% moisture to around 10-15% if you did everything right.
That’s why many expert growers use the drying & curing techniques outlined below to fine tune their end product.
Take off the fan leaves and trim the bigger sugar leaves. You can do this with a pair of spring-loaded trimming scissors that you can pick up for $10 bucks. In the end, your buds should look like this:
Of course, you can cure your buds for 6 months if you want to, but I think it’s better to keep things optimal.
Take the buds off from the stems (which are definitely not used for consumption), trim the remaining sugar leaves and leave only flowers.

  • The ideal drying room conditions are 75° Fahrenheit (23° Celsius) with 50% humidity (use a Digital Humidistat to monitor your humidity levels)
  • Make sure to space out the branches so the air can flow between the buds
  • Your weed is dry enough to cure when the buds feel crispy to the touch, but they still spring back a little bit when pressed (be gentle when testing)
  • It’s better to over-dry the buds then under-dry them, as they can become moldy (which ruins the taste and even makes them toxic)

Find out what is the best way to dry weed and get one step closer to the highest possible quality buds. Weed curing guide included.