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lambs breath weed

Lamb’s Breath is incredibly difficult to find in seed or clipping. Unlike most strains of cannabis, it flourishes best in an outdoor environment where its roots can spread out. And if you do get your hands on it, you must remember that its ideal climate is hot and dry like its native Jamaica. While it does create some unique obstacles for growers, it is easy for even a beginner or novice to grow if you give it space and an arid environment.

Lamb’s Breath is potent sativa cannabis, so those who are prone to anxiety may wish to avoid this strain. The most significant potential negatives are racing thoughts and dry eyes. This strain can stoke your appetite as well, which is a positive for many medical patients but a drawback to many recreational users.
The buds of this strain are everything you’d want out of weed: large but pleasingly dense, and impressively sticky. A good batch will have a significant number of red-orange pistils dotting the nugs. A sugar-like coat of trichomes should cover every nug. When you smoke Lamb’s Bread, you’ll note that the flavor is clean, with a hint of grassy sweetness. Often, the hint of spice will carry through from the aroma, giving the whole experience just a bit of kick.

Fans of Lamb’s Breath love it for its strong sativa effects, which settle in a few minutes after smoking. There’s no sudden explosion of euphoria or blast of imaginative power, just the steady onset of an uplifting high. You’ll naturally start to feel happy, more energized, and maybe even more focused and creative. The effects are cerebral, and there’s no body high users experience. That means no couchlock, and no de-motivation to get in the way of whatever activities you might pursue while high. This is a perfect strain for those who want to positively shift their mood but avoid the sensation of being “stoned.”
Lamb’s Breath is the descendant of an original Jamaican landrace strain, meaning that it occurred naturally before being tamed and bred by humans. Resulting from an obscure origin, no single phenotype of Lamb’s Breath dominates the market.
Lamb’s Bread is highly sativa dominant, measuring between 70% and 95% sativa depending on the phenotype. Lamb’s Bread is said to be a favorite strain of none other than Bob Marley himself, and anyone who smokes it will quickly find out why. It all starts with the irresistible aroma, which contains a bouquet of light grassy, floral notes and the zesty tang of limonene, along with sweetly earthy undertones. Most examples of this strain will have an intriguing hint of spice to the scent, which creates complexity in this otherwise straightforward aroma.
Lamb’s Breath, also known as Lamb’s Bread, is the descendant of the Jamaican landrace cannabis strain. With such legendary fans as Bob Marley and Peter Tosh, Lamb’s Breath can meet even the highest standards. This sativa strain has more than one phenotype, so users should expect some variation in appearance and effect. What all phenotypes have in common is a light, cerebral high that produces creative energy and a deep happiness that can last for hours. Lamb’s Breath is socially stimulating and works well for those with depression. Lamb’s Breath flowers quickly and is an excellent choice for growers with minimal experience.
Lamb’s Breath can vary in THC and CBD content depending on who grew it. Because it’s an ancient landrace strain, many growers have made slight adjustments here and there that result in differences. Some varieties of Lamb’s Breath contain a little over 1% CBD, and other variations have almost none at all.

There are many versions of Lamb’s Breath out there, particularly in Portland and all over California. The pickings are a little slimmer in Colorado and Washington, but astute shoppers will find Lamb’s Breath there, too.

Lamb’s Breath, also known as Lamb’s Bread, is the descendant of the Jamaican landrace cannabis strain . With such legendary fans as Bob Marley and Peter Tosh, Lamb’s Breath can meet even the highest standards. This sativa strain has more than one phenotype, so users should expect some variation in appearance and effect. What all phenotypes have in common is