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is weed good for cataracts

Lyons, who is a professor in the department of ophthalmology and visual sciences at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, still described the research as “timely,” given the increasing trend towards legalization of marijuana in the United States, for both medical and recreational use.
Lyons suggested that “further, more robust studies are needed to test whether long-term use of cannabis has any effect on retinal or optic nerve function.”
The answer: Regular pot users do appear to experience a slight delay in their RGC signaling. And that could indicate impaired vision, the study authors said.
His team noted that marijuana has long been known to have an impact on nervous system communications.
Although the result could signal the potential for vision trouble, the team noted that it did not necessarily prove that regular smokers do actually experience vision impairment. The association seen in the study also did not prove that pot use actually caused the delay in RGC signaling, the researchers said.
Those tests determined that regular pot users experienced a 10-millisecond delay in the speed with which their RGCs sent key signals to the brain via the optic nerve.
Dr. Christopher Lyons co-authored an editorial that accompanied the study. He said that “the evidence [in the study] for decreased retinal function is weak for several reasons.”
But Paul Armentano, deputy director of NORML, the nonprofit marijuana advocacy organization, argued that “it remains unclear at this time whether or not these findings possess any real-world significance.”
Laprevote also pointed out that most of the participants did not complain of any vision issues before the study began. He suggested, however, that smokers might be experiencing vision trouble without being consciously aware of it.
Study suggests that it might slow signaling among cells that deliver visual information to the brain