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humidity for drying cannabis

Humidity for drying cannabis

In fact, charas is made by manually rubbing fresh flowers to get a thick layer of resin (hash) attached to the hands. This is precisely what we want to avoid here if we want to keep our buds in perfect condition!

In our post about drying and curing cannabis, we gave you the basic information to dry your flowers perfectly. In this article we will focus on the most common mistakes made when drying our precious buds, mistakes that as we say can ruin the flowers we have been caring for months. Let’s see what the typical errors are when drying marijuana.
It’s important to control the temperature and humidity in the drying room

Both when we’re cutting the plants or during the trimming process (and also when hanging them to dry), it’s very important not to handle the flowers excessively. Trichome heads – where the various compounds that give cannabis its flavour and high are produced and stored – are very delicate, and can easily break off if we touch the buds too much.
The ideal is to dry the plants in a relatively cool, well ventilated and dark place. This way, we will avoid many of the factors that can cause drying to reduce the quality of our harvest.
As with humidity, an incorrect temperature can ruin our flowers, as can drying them in full daylight. Temperatures over 25 degrees can dry the plant too fast, the ideal temperature being about 18-20 degrees celsius. On the other hand, if we dry the plants in the light this will degrade part of the content of the trichomes, reducing the final quality of the buds.
It’s very important to remove any mouldy parts of the plant before drying
We hope this article helps you to get finished buds of the highest quality. A last and useful advice: if your buds have got too dry, you can put them in a hermetic jar with a few fresh weed leaves (or some other vegetable). In this way, the buds will recover moisture, which they absorb as the leaves release it. When they are at the ideal point, we just need to remove the leaves and begin the curing process.

Once we see that we’re at the optimum point of harvest, it’s time to cut the plants. A common mistake, which can delay drying for several days, is harvesting the plants when the substrate is wet, or to put it another way, when the water content within the plants tissues is at the maximum. So if we want to properly dry our buds in the shortest time possible, it’s best to harvest the plants when the substrate has been dry for at least one day and their internal water content will be therefore lower.

The 7 most common errors drying cannabis After months of giving our plants all the care they require, the time to harvest finally arrives. Whichever variety of cannabis you cultivate, you’ll

Humidity for drying cannabis

The size of your buds will obviously affect drying time, as larger, denser buds will take longer to dry than smaller ones. How you choose to trim your plants will also come into play. Remember that the branches of your plants hold the most water, so if you hang large branches, these will take longer to dry than smaller branches or individual buds. Finally, the temperature, humidity, and airflow in your drying space will also have a big impact on the time it takes for your weed to dry.

There’s a simple test to know if your buds are dry: Simply take a small branch and try to bend it. If it snaps, your buds are dry and you’re ready to move on to the curing process. If they bend, your buds need a little longer to dry.
For best results, you should hang or otherwise position your trimmed buds in a dark room with good air circulation and a relative humidity of about 45–55%.

There are many factors that affect how long it takes for cannabis to dry.
Curing is super important because it helps preserve your weed so it can be stored over time—while still retaining its unique flavour and maximising potency. When you harvest your buds, they contain excess sugars and starches that eventually come under attack from airborne bacteria and enzymes. By curing your buds, you actually encourage the degradation of these nutrients, making for a smoother, better-tasting final smoke.
The process of growing cannabis does not stop at harvest time. Properly drying and curing your fresh cannabis stash is paramount to prevent mould contamination from taking place. These procedures will also result in buds that taste better and offer a superior high.
Once your buds are dry and trimmed, place them in big, wide-mouthed jars (mason or jam jars work great). Fill the jars about ¾ of the way so there’s room for additional air, and to reduce the risk of mould or mildew ruining your harvest. Once you’ve filled up your jars, store them in a dry, dark environment (like a kitchen cupboard) and check on your buds at least once per day for two weeks.
Ahhh, harvest time. After watching your ladies grow and flower, it’s finally time to collect your hard-earned buds. But before you can enjoy a toke of some homegrown Kush, you’ll need to dry and cure your freshly harvested weed. Below, we’ll share our answers to some frequently asked questions on the drying and curing process, so you can maximise the flavour and potency of your stash.

Get the answers to 9 of the most frequently asked questions about drying and curing cannabis.

Properly drying and curing your fresh cannabis harvest is essential to decrease the risk of mould, and to enhance the taste and high that your buds offer.