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how many plants can you grow in washington

(3) The study, findings, and recommendations required under this section must be done through the use of the existing resources of the state liquor and cannabis board.

  • Allow recreational home grows under a strict state regulatory framework that requires a permit and tracking of plants throughout the state, with enforcement jurisdiction shared between the WSLCB and local authorities.
  • Absent a permit, growing marijuana for any purpose is illegal.
  • Require tracking of all plants in the traceability system to help prevent diversion.
  • Limit of no more than 4 plants per household.
  • Include a statutory provision that allows law enforcement to seize and destroy all plants possessed by a person if the person has more plants than the law allows.
  • Include a statutory provision to allow recreational growers to acquire plants from licensed producers so long as the person possesses a valid permit.
  • Include requirements for security, preventing youth access, preventing diversion, etc.
  • Include the same restrictions that apply to medical marijuana patients on processing marijuana in recreational home grows (no extraction with combustible materials. See WAC 314-55-430).

Home Grow Regulatory Options

Sec. 24. (1) The state liquor and cannabis board must conduct a study of regulatory options for the legalization of marijuana plant possession and cultivation by recreational marijuana users. In conducting the study, the state liquor and cannabis board must consider the federal guidelines provided by the Cole memorandum, issued by the United States department of justice on August 29, 2013, which allows individual states to implement marijuana legalization policies, provided such states enact strong and effective regulatory and enforcement systems that address public safety, public health, and law enforcement concerns as outlined in the memorandum.
1. Strictly Regulated Recreational Home Grows
3. Prohibit Recreational Home Grows.
(2) Not later than December 1, 2017, the state liquor and cannabis board must provide the appropriate committees of the legislature written findings and recommendations regarding the adoption and implementation of a regulatory and enforcement system for the legalization of marijuana plant possession and cultivation by recreational marijuana users, in light of the guidelines set forth in the federal Cole memorandum.

  • Allow recreational home grows under a regulatory framework based on statewide standards set in statute, but authorized, controlled, and enforced by local jurisdictions (counties, cities).
  • Include statutory requirements for security, preventing youth access, preventing diversion, etc. (Cole Memo).
  • Require a permit to possess plants. Absent a permit, growing marijuana for any purpose is illegal.
  • Limit of no more than 4 plants per household.
  • Include a statutory provision to allow recreational growers to acquire plants from licensed producers so long as the person possesses a valid permit.
  • Include a statutory provision that allows law enforcement to seize and destroy all plants possessed by a person if the person has more plants than the law allows.
  • Include the same restrictions that apply to medical marijuana patients on processing marijuana in recreational home grows (no extraction with combustible materials. See WAC 314-55-430).
  • The Legislature may choose to allow local jurisdictions to “opt-in” for or “opt-out” of allowing recreational home grows, similar to the approach the Legislature took with marijuana licenses and registered medical marijuana patient cooperative grows.

2. State Framework, Local Authority Recreational Home Grows

Home Grow Regulatory Options Sec. 24. (1) The state liquor and cannabis board must conduct a study of regulatory options for the legalization of marijuana plant possession and cultivation by

How many plants can you grow in washington

The House is considering a bill that allow Washington residents to grow as many as six marijuana plants for recreational use in their home and have up to 24 ounces of the drug on hand. Current law allows medical marijuana users in some cases to grow their plants at home, but not recreational users.

One of David Taylor’s marijuana plants are seen at his growing facilities on Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017, in Spokane, Wash. Taylor said that regulation makes it hard for small growers to stay afloat financially. Licensed marijuana stores would face a statewide ban on billboards ads under a bill considered Tuesday by a Washington House committee. (Tyler Tjomsland / The Spokesman-Review)
OLYMPIA – Washington could follow other states that have legalized marijuana for recreational use and allow residents to grow a limited number of plants at home, but such a law might be hard to enforce, a House committee was told Monday.

“It’s a God-given herb. I should be able to have it in my garden,” Dawn Darington told the House Commerce and Gaming Committee, which has jurisdiction over most marijuana legislation.
Mitch Barker, of the Washington Association of Police Chiefs, said local agencies will have trouble enforcing the law, particularly if they get reports that someone is growing a few more plants than the limit.
The committee could vote on the bill in the coming weeks.
The problem stems from Initiative 502, which legalized marijuana for recreational use and set up a state system to regulate its production and sales. It didn’t have a provision for home grows, Bailey Hirschberg, of marijuana-law reform group Washington NORML, said.
The state Liquor and Cannabis Board, which oversees legal marijuana operations in the state, is concerned about the risk of home grows spreading, Justin Nordhorm, the agency’s chief of enforcement, said. And it also doesn’t have the resources available to enforce such a limit.

But Jennifer Monds of Kennewick said the Legislature may be moving too quickly to allow recreational marijuana to be grown at home: “We have no safety provisions in place protecting our children from the serious issues surrounding home grows.”

House panel considers letting recreational marijuana users “grow their own.”