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growing a single weed plant

Growing a single weed plant

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The Reef Capitol Hill
When choosing your soil, opting for an organic option is your best bet. Coco or peat-based mediums are also good choices. Many organic potting soils will come with nutrients already mixed in them. This allows you to feed your plants less, reducing the nutrients you’ll need to purchase throughout the grow cycle of your plant. One bag of quality organic soil should do the trick if you’re only growing one plant.

Before a cannabis plant begins to flower and is still growing, it is in what is known as the vegetative state. You want to let your plant stay in veg under 16+ hours of light for at least 4-6 weeks. The idea is to let your plant get as big and healthy as possible before they begin to flower so you can get the highest possible yield when they’re done.
by Jen Keehn – May 3, 2018
Growing one plant isn’t just the easiest way to keep you smoking for free all year long, it’s an extremely awesome experience. Besides, weed is now legal in over half the country in one way or another. In several states you can legitimately grow your own without having to worry about a thing. And even if you don’t live in a legal state , the chances that the cops come breaking in your door over one plant are pretty slim.
If you’re ready to get your green thumb on and grow your own weed, growing just one plant in your house isn’t just rewarding, it’s also extremely easy.
Take Miracle Grow. Its soil blend has poor drainage and contains time-released nutrients that contain high levels of nitrogen. This slow release of nitrogen can not only harm your plants but can reduce your overall yield.

When it comes to nutrients, organic is always best. There are several options for affordable organic nutrients that will ensure your plant grows healthy and strong. While common, synthetic nutrients are easy to find (think Miracle Grow), they’re not the best for growing weed. Not only are they artificial, but your plant will need different nutrients in various stages of its growth.

If you’re interested in growing some quality ganja, you don’t need to cultivate an entire crop to do so. You can successfully grow one plant in your house.

Growing a single weed plant

As the weather warms up, so do most smokers. There is something about the spring and summer months that brings out the toker in all of us. And, sometimes, it brings out our green thumbs, too! For the more enthusiastic marijuana lover, their attention often turns from rolling joints to another facet of the plant—cultivation. Around this time every year, we get flooded with questions from the home hobbyist asking about growing just one little cannabis plant in their own home.

Once your plant has developed enough and reached a point that she can produce enough flowers for a decent harvest, it is time to bring her light cycle to an even 12 hours of light and 12 hours of dark each day. This does not mean that you will no longer need your lamp though. During the 12-hour photoperiod of flowering, the plant will need the strongest light possible to help her produce energy for her fruit.
Your lamp is going to be the most expensive part of the process, but there are relatively inexpensive lamps available that will do the job. Serious growers use more specialized and expensive lamps, but to grow just one plant at home, many lights will work. A 250-watt HID (high-intensity discharge) bulb—either an HPS (high-pressure sodium) or MH (metal halide)—can be found in hardware stores such as Lowe’s or Home Depot for as little as $25. However, these bulbs do require a specialized HID fixture and/or ballast, as they do not screw into any standard home fixture safely. (These fixtures may run as much as $200.)

We call it “weed” for a reason—because it grows easily and anywhere, like a weed. That being said, there is one central aspect of growing a pot plant that everyone needs to understand, and that is that cannabis is a flowering plant, meaning that in nature it bears its fruits only once a year, during the fall season when the daylight hours grow shorter.
Alternatively, if you do have a window with very good light and the power of the sun for a good portion of the day, you can also use fluorescent bulbs to supplement the sunlight after sunset. Fluorescent bulbs such as T5’s, T8’s or even CFL’s can provide enough light to keep your plant in a vegetative state.
Well, that’s music to our ears here at High Times! After all, we’ve been doing this for 40 plus years, and now and marijuana is (mostly) legal in over half the country. And to be sure, no law enforcement is going to harass you over just one plant, even on their slowest day.
If your plant could be in direct sunlight for these 12 hours, you would not need strong supplemental lighting. However, even outdoors this is usually not possible. Your best option for flowering is to move your plant into an enclosed location such as a closet or cabinet where you can hang your lamp overhead and control the light cycle exactly as needed. To do this, use a standard outlet timer and set it to a 12-hour cycle.
This is important for the home indoor grower because the light period, or photoperiod, of the plant, must be controlled. What this simply means is that a pot plant must be placed in 12+ hours of light every day in order to keep the plant from flowering.

Well, in truth, you could do that. But if an immature plant flowers too early, there won’t be much harvest to be had. Ideally, a pot plant needs to grow, or “vegetate,” for at least a few weeks before flowering. Otherwise, the harvesting of its fruit will be extremely disappointing.

As the weather warms up, so do most smokers. There is something about the spring and summer months that brings out the toker in all of us. And, sometimes, it br