Posted on

first time high on weed

First time high on weed
Smoking or vaping weed is a bit easier to dose because the effects are much quicker and milder. Newbies might want to take a hit and wait 10 minutes or so and repeat as needed. Again, this isn’t a race.
What about tinctures?
Edibles might seem convenient and innocent enough (yay brownies!), but you need to be very careful with dosing. When you buy an edible at a dispensary, more than likely the dose is going to be 10 milligrams of THC. Which can be too much for a beginner.
Our in-house Know-It-Alls answer questions about your interactions with technology.
Q: One of my relatives wants to get into cannabis (which is legal in their home state, of course). Should I tell them to smoke weed or do edibles?
A: Ah, the joys and terrors of exploring cannabis. We’ve all heard tales about overdoing it—maybe like me you once stood in line at an ice cream shop dumbfounded by the exchange of goods and services for money. But it doesn’t have to be this way! You can guide your relative as Virgil guided Dante, only without all the nightmares.
Whether your relative decides to smoke or do edibles, I’ll give you a little secret to pass along: Before doing either, start with a CBD tincture. CBD, or cannabidiol, is a non-psychoactive compound in cannabis. And it is insanely popular right now: Manufacturers have been putting it in face creams and claiming it can cure pretty much any ailment a human can suffer. Science has yet to confirm almost every single one of those claims, though CBD does seem to at least have anti-anxiety and anti-inflammatory properties.
So follow the most important rule for cannabis, and for edibles in particular: Start low and go slow. You probably want to begin with a dose closer to 2 or 3 milligrams. You might not feel anything from it, but you’re going to prefer that to overdoing it and descending into paranoia. Wait an hour, if not longer to be safe (we metabolize things differently on different days, after all), and try a bit more. Low and slow.
It may be “just” a plant, but cannabis is an extraordinarily complicated drug that science is just beginning to understand. It demands respect and takes practice. The first thing to know when helping your relative decide between edibles or the smoking route is that the human body processes THC—the psychoactive compound in cannabis—differently for each. Smoke (or vape) cannabis and it goes to your bloodstream and makes its way immediately into your brain. Eat it, and the liver gets first dibs at processing the THC, turning it into 11-hydroxy-THC, which is five times as potent. The high will be delayed, but the effects last much longer.
Make sure they know the difference between THC and CDB, and remember: Low and slow
Tuesday August 13, 2019
Also, consider how the cannabis is being consumed. If the person doesn’t feel the effects of the smoke in a few minutes, then the person may need to explore some of the other reasons on this list. However, with edibles, vaping and other methods of consumption, it is best to keep in mind that the onset effects vary, sometimes taking around two hours to kick in. This is especially true with edibles. Don’t be like comedian Jason Mantzoukas and his first time getting high using cannabutter (see video above).
It’s highly doubtful this is the case, but smoking CBD flower definitely won’t lead to anyone getting high for the first time. Sure, they’ll likely feel some effects, but not like THC can provide. If a person says they are looking to get high and they have Charlotte’s Web or ACDC, then you may need to give them a small bit of difficult news. Conversely, in states where cannabis is still illegal, black market dealers have been known to “cut” cannabis flower with CBD flower in an effort to make extra profits.
Not all cannabis is created equal. Today’s crops of cannabis are more likely to range in the teens to mid-30s when it comes to THC potency. This sharp increase in marijuana potency should ensure that every person gets high every time, right? In theory, yes. But several factors may have made that seemingly fire strain rather extinguished by the time you light it up. Starting with the producer, they could have a contaminated crop. That means anything from a leaky roof allowing rainwater onto the plant to miscategorized flower all potentially ruining a high.
Keep in mind that cannabis affects everyone differently and the high a person experiences can and likely will vary by person. Factors can include a person’s height, weight and metabolism. Think about how a larger-sized person probably needs to consume more alcohol to feel drunk or ingest more food to feel full. The physical makeup of a person will often be the culprit if physical limitations are what’s holding them back from experiencing THC. In other cases, however, additional internal factors can alter one’s experience. This includes any issues relating to a person’s hormones as well as their serotonin and dopamine levels.
E ver have that friend that says they just can’t get high? Maybe you were that person that couldn’t get stoned their first time. Or, if you’re like me, you got so high your first time that it is difficult to comprehend how someone can’t get high off cannabis. For anyone frustrated or confused by this early-stage consumption phenomenon, consider the points below. They may apply to you or someone you know.
Keep in mind that cannabis exploration should be fun. Save for a physical limitation, in due time a person is almost assured to find what dosage and method of consumption is the best way for them to get high. Safe consumption is always advised as well. Be sure to use extra caution if you find yourself unable to get high right away. Don’t get frustrated and overdo it. Keep on exploring and slowly scaling up if need be. The high will come, and when it does it will be that much more worthwhile.
A reliable storage method won’t protect flower forever, either. Just like everything other than honey, cannabis has an expiration date. Once that date passes or is exposed to enough UV light, the THC and THCA in the plant can convert to other cannabinoids, namely CBN and CBNA. While these cannabinoids won’t harm a person, they may have them experiencing different effects than expected. This could potentially result in a person thinking they aren’t high.
If a person doesn’t get high the first time, those around them may suggest that they try a different approach to smoking. One of the more common mistakes new consumers make is treating cannabis like cigarettes. While they may appear similar, their consumption methods are rather different. Namely, nicotine is held in the mouth by the user. Whereas with cannabis, it is recommended that the person inhale the smoke right into their body without holding it in their mouth.
Cannabis affects everyone differently and the high a person experiences can and likely will vary by person. Many people claim they cant get stoned the first time smoking. Click hear to better comprehend this early-stage consumption phenomenon.