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fastest way to sober up from weed

I t can happen when you least expect it: You just finished an awesome smoke sesh when you realize you’ve got to do something important – and you’re WAY too high to do it. Maybe it’s a last-minute trip to the bank before they close for the weekend or maybe you forgot a shift at work. Whatever your reason for needing to sober up from a marijuana high in a hurry, here are a few tips to help get you there.

As unpleasant as it may seem, hopping in a cold shower for a few minutes can help you calm down from a marijuana high very quickly. If a shower isn’t available, just splash a bit of cold water on your face. This works because cold water triggers what’s called the “mammalian diving reflex,” or an immediate decreased heart rate, as a means of survival. It will also drop your body temperature, conserve energy and preserve excess oxygen (and thus THC).
Friends can calm you down during a panic attack and can keep you grounded during bouts of confusion. They will also be able to take care of you should something go wrong, and will help you locate the remote control in the freezer when you’ve given up looking, too. Just make sure you pick the right friends 🙂

Friday May 6, 2016
If all else fails, you can always try to counteract the THC with other medicines like ibuprofen or if you have a prescription for it, anti-anxiety medication.
Sometimes, a quick catnap is all that’s needed to come down quickly. Allow yourself 30 minutes to rest (much longer may cause you to feel even more groggy later) and find somewhere comfortable and away from distractions. Just remember to set an alarm if you’ve got somewhere to be or you may find yourself down for the count thanks to marijuana’s sometimes powerful sedative properties.
Take your mind off of your unpleasant high by distracting yourself with something challenging. If you have friends over, suggest a game of some sort or pull out a book or video game. Just try to avoid overly complex mind games as they may have you feeling more frustrated than relieved.
If THC is the “Ying” then CBD is the “Yang”. CBD is essentially nature’s antidote to the high THC can produce. In simple terms, CBD works by blocking THC from binding with the cannabinoid receptors in your brain, toning down the effects from THC. Even if you live in a non-marijuana friendly state, you can still order Hemp CBD Oil which is legal in all 50 states and will have the same effect as cannabis CBD. Never hurts to have some on hand just in case. If you are in a legal state, Mary’s Medicinals sells a rescue tonic specifically designed to bring you down in a hurry.

PS: If you’re looking for products that WON’T get you high, check out CBD oils, tinctures & more.

If you need to sober up quickly after consuming marijuana, here are a few tips on how to detox from a cannabis high.

Fastest way to sober up from weed

By shifting your attention from how high you are to an enjoyable activity, you’ll probably be able to shed that uncomfortable marijuana high in no time. (Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps)

Though marijuana has medical and therapeutic uses, including reducing anxiety, smoking copious amounts of potent weed can send a consumer into a tailspin fraught with anxiety and paranoia. (Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps)
Unfortunately, smoking yourself sober is not an option. Instead, the first and perhaps not-so-obvious step is to stop smoking if you feel uncomfortable after consuming cannabis. It’s also crucial to be overly cautious when ingesting edibles, as the full effects can take several hours to kick in and tend to pack a powerful punch. If you’re wondering what to do when too high on flower, edibles, or concentrate, here are some quick tips to show you how to come down from a high that gets too intense.

That’s right. The same kitchen ingredient used to spice up your food also can simmer down your high. Black peppercorn has demonstrated the ability to provide near-instant relief for those overcome by cannabis-induced paranoia or anxiety. Chew a few whole black peppercorns, grind peppercorn on food, or, very carefully, smell ground pepper.
Decades of research have shown that cannabidiol (CBD), a non-intoxicating cannabinoid found in the cannabis plant, can reduce THC-induced anxiety and paranoia. In a February 1982 study published in Psychopharmacology, researchers examined whether CBD could reduce anxiety from THC. The study concluded that CBD “might be involved in the antagonism of effects between the two cannabinoids.” A more recent study , published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology on Jan. 27, 2013, also found that when CBD was consumed alongside THC, it appeared to lessen the adverse effects of anxiety and paranoia.
Terpenes are the aromatic oils that give each cannabis plant its own distinct smell, flavor, and effects. The same way that CBD and THC combine to create an “entourage effect,” the variety of terpenoids found in cannabis and other plants seem to have a synergistic relationship with the other cannabis compounds. A citrusy terpene called limonene, which is found in the rinds of citrus fruits and in certain strains of cannabis, has demonstrated the ability to reduce anxiety. A 2012 study into this terpene found that it produced anxiety-reducing or “anxiolytic-like effects,” which could translate positively into a treatment for cannabis-induced anxiety.
Go for a walk, put on your favorite music or television show, have a conversation with a stoned companion, anything that will help distract you from the sudden bout with cannabis-induced anxiety. By shifting your attention from how high you are to an enjoyable activity, you’ll probably be able to shed that uncomfortable marijuana high in no time.
The soothing, refreshing action of water on your body can calm a too-high high quickly. Think of it as a form of mental hydration, a hygienic way to wash away the ills of too much THC. Even splashing cold water onto your face should help restore your calm, decrease your heart rate, and ease your mind.

A 2011 review published in the British Journal of Pharmacology found that cannabis and black pepper have related chemical traits. Author Dr. Ethan Russo, a neurologist and psychopharmacology researcher, wrote that terpenes such as beta-caryophyllene found in peppercorn can help “tame the intoxicating effects of THC.” Beta-caryophyllene and THC form a synergistic relationship and bind to the same cannabinoid receptors, creating a calming effect.

Too High? How to Sober up From Weed Even the most seasoned cannabis enthusiast has a story about that time they overdid it and scrambled to find out how to sober up from weed . Though marijuana