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drinking milk before drug test

“The bottom line is toxicologists are smarter than drug abusers,” Dasgupta told reporters at a meeting of the American Association for Clinical Chemistry in Washington. “If try to cheat on a drug test, we will catch you.”

Experts Say Internet and Household Products Bring New Challenges to Drug Testing
“There is no magic formulation which can take drugs out of your body,” Dasgupta says.

That’s usually true. But even Dasgupta concedes there are some holes in his drug-testing net. He says parents should be on the lookout for over-the-counter eyedrops. A full vial of the easy-to-buy product can successfully mask THC — marijuana’s active ingredient — if it’s added to a urine sample.
July 28, 2008 — Vinegar. Lemon juice. Drain-cleaning products. At least one of these items is probably in your kitchen. And any of them can be used to beat a drug test.
Many schools also conduct drug tests on students trying to join sports teams, or, more controversially, sometimes conduct tests on a random basis.
Many household items change urine’s pH, or acidity, when they’re added to it; most of the time that renders a sample useless for testing. But these are not the cheating methods that worry testers like Dasgupta.
“Does it work? Yes, it does,” says Amitava Dasgupta, PhD, a professor of pathology and drug testing expert from the University of Texas-Houston Medical Center. “It’s a cat and mouse game.”

But there’s a catch: the simple addition of some hydrogen peroxide will turn a PCC-containing urine sample dark brown.

Experts say the Internet and the easy availability of some household products are bringing new challenges for labs that test for drug use.