Posted on

colorful marijuana strains

Colorful marijuana strains

Many different parts of a cannabis plant can turn purple, including the whole plant!

Calyxes are what make the buds themselves. Cannabis “buds” are actually made of hundreds of calyxes stacked on top of each other, and some or all of them may become colors other than green.
Blue Dream (rare deep purple phenotype)

If there’s a lot of purple leaves, there may be a lot of color left even after trimming.
Temperature makes a difference! Some strains need contrast between day/night temperatures for their buds to turn colors. For example, the buds of this Auto Frisian Dew turned bright purple after it started getting below 70°F (21°C) temperatures at night.
Note: Some strains turn color no matter what the temperature. You can sometimes contact the breeder and ask if they have advice on how to bring out colors for a particular strain. I’ve found that most breeders will get back to you quickly if you go to their website and ask questions!
Purple Trainwreck
A closer look at those buds so you can better see how much bud is purple and how much is green after being trimmed and dried (click for a closeup!)

If growing multiple plants of the same strain, you might consider giving plants different pH ranges to see what effect it has on the final bud color!

How can you grow colorful buds that turn purple or pink? Learn which strains to get, as well as what you can do to maximize color during your grow.

Of course, every batch of flower will come with its own unique scents, potency, and color. But if you’re looking for a purple strain to impress your smoking buddies nearly every time, pick up an eighth of The Black when you see it at your local dispensary.

What flower strains should you look out for if you want to smoke the rainbow? And why does certain weed look dark purple, while other varietals are bright orange or pink?
So, with all of that information about how cannabis gets its color, what strains should you look out for if you want to smoke the rainbow? Well, as we’ve shown, no strain is guaranteed to produce any one color in its buds, but here are a few of our favorite flower varietals with genetic dispositions prone to vibrant hues.

Grandaddy Purple — or GDP for short — has been a staple in California’s indica-heavy diet since the start of the new millenium. A cross between Purple Urkle and Big Bud, GDP is one of the weed world’s most notorious purp strains, with a heavy dose of berry flavor to match its typically dark purple coloring.
Like most cannabis strains with a pop of color, Pink Panties has its expected hues right there in the name. A cross of multiple OG Kush varieties, and first released by Mr. Sherbinski, don’t let the close-to-vulgar name turn you off to this citrusy strain with light purple coloring that often borders on magenta.
First introduced by cultivator Ken Estes in the San Francisco Bay Area, Grandaddy Purple has become the poster child for purple strains around the globe, with more name drops in rap songs than we can count.
What Do pH Levels Have to Do With Cannabis Colors?
For cannabis connoisseurs, the intoxicating effects of THC are only one aspect of the overall marijuana experience. Past the high, there’s the scent, the taste, the bud structure, and of course, the colors.

How Does Weed Get Its Color?

What flower strains should you look out for if you want to smoke the rainbow? And why does certain weed look dark purple, while other varietals are bright orange or pink?