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cloning autoflowering cannabis

Cloning autoflowering cannabis

After the roots grow a bit, you can introduce them to artificial light or sunlight and they will grow normally like any other cannabis plant. Cloning is perfect for photoperiod strains, but the question is if the same applies for autoflowering plants.

Cloning is nothing but a method of propagating or producing more cannabis plants from one single mother plant. This technique is performed because of the asexual reproduction of your beloved cannabis plant.
So, for the process of cloning, you choose a healthy female. It needs to be about 4 weeks at least. It must also possess 4-6 nodes for you to take cuttings. You must ensure that it receives a minimum of 18 hours of light to prevent it from entering the flowering stage.

It will put all its energy into growing beautiful buds and cloning at this stage will produce a plant that won’t have enough time to grow. Due to inadequate growth, the plant will produce very few buds. And, the result will be a small, stunted plant with almost no yield.
So, why can’t I simply sow seeds of the mother plant to replicate it, you ask? Well, although planting seeds can give you some of the genetics of the parent plant, cloning guarantees that you get the exact replica with absolutely no changes.
Yep, they are amazing and can produce two batches of harvest in the time taken to produce one batch of photoperiod strains. However, it is due to this very reason that you can’t clone autoflowers successfully.
In simple terms, autoflowers have a preset cycle and they will start flowering within just 3-4 weeks of growth. Like photoperiod plants, autoflowers can be cloned as well. But, will the clones develop into other plants? Will the cloning will successful? That’s another question altogether.
Once the plant reaches a certain size, a healthy cutting is taken from the parent plant so that the cutting develops roots of its own and develops into another plant. Cloning is a sure-shot way to ensure that you replicate the mother plant.

What if I take the clone when the plant is just 2 weeks old, you ask? Well, the plant is too small to take a cutting. Firstly, you’d end up with a small cutting that probably won’t grow, but what’s worse is that you’d be hindering the mother plant’s growth too.

Growing cannabis is extremely interesting because you can experiment in several ways to get the desired outcome. Over the years, cannabis growers have come up w

Cloning autoflowering cannabis

However, it is important to remember that autos are not fully stabilised in every case (buying seeds only from reputable outlets reduces the risk here) and may take considerably longer than stated. Despite this, even the autos that take the longest to grow outdoors (eighteen weeks from seed to harvest seems to be the upper limit) are still favourable compared to photoperiod-dependent plants in terms of total grow time.

Some botanists classify it as a species in its own right, others that it is a subspecies of Cannabis Indica or Cannabis Sativa. In 2003, chemotaxic and genetic analysis of cannabinoid variation in 157 varieties of cannabis indicated that C. sativa and C. indica were two separate species, and that C. ruderalis is a subspecies of C. sativa. However, even this is disputed. In 2005, new analysis revealed that C. ruderalis may indeed be a species in its own right, and a ‘sister’ species to C. indica and C. sativa.
Qualities of the C. ruderalis include:

Over the last decade or two, breeders have experimented with crossing C. ruderalis genetics with desirable, high-cannabinoid strains to produce commercially-useful autoflowering hybrids. It is possible that certain other autoflowering landraces may also have played a part in developing the first “autos”, such as a plant known as the “Mexican Rudy”. As the name suggests, this was a ruderalis-type plant found in Mexico. It was used to produce LowRyder, one of the first commercial autoflowering strains on the market.
However, successive generations of crosses and backcrosses have led to the development of a range of higher-potency strains that are generally known as super-autos. Super-autos are also typically much taller and bushier than standard autos and their ruderalis ancestor, and may reach 90-100cm in height. A good selection of auto and super-auto strains can be found here.
Autoflowering cannabis varieties have been steadily gaining in popularity over the last five years or so, as improved breeding techniques have created new and better strains. Now, it is possible to grow abundant, high-potency harvests in as little as nine or ten weeks, from germination to harvest.
The first wave of commercial autos, including LowRyder, were typically very small in stature (usually reaching a maximum of 40cm in height), low in cannabinoid content, and somewhat lacking in flavour and potency.
There is also the possibility that certain hormonal and metabolic processes do occur in darkness, and that allowing your plants to have a “rest” at night-time leads to overall increased health and vigour. However, this is purely anecdotal and there is no empirical evidence to back this up, at least in the case of autoflowering cannabis.

  • Short vegetative periods and short flowering periods
  • Not dependent on light/day cycles to begin flowering
  • Is hardy and resistant to frost and cold climates
  • Always found at 50°N of the equator or even higher latitudes.

Autoflowering Cannabis FAQ: 7 Must-Know Facts Autoflowering cannabis varieties have been steadily gaining in popularity over the last five years or so, as improved breeding techniques have