Cannabis Male Or Female Seeds

When it comes to harvesting home-grown marijuana, female plants are the name of the game. Not only do female plants produce the coveted buds needed for medicinal purposes, but they also have higher potency and THC content compared to their… Difference Between Male and Female Weed Seeds Male vs Female Weed Seeds Plants, like animals, have male and female varieties. The male plants produce pollen which pollinates the flowers of female plants. Flowers that have been pollinated produce seeds. Marijuana, or weed plants, are also either male or female. Female marijuana weed plants that have not been pollinated are called “sinsemilla” or

How to Identify Female and Male Marijuana Plants

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When it comes to harvesting home-grown marijuana, female plants are the name of the game. Not only do female plants produce the coveted buds needed for medicinal purposes, but they also have higher potency and THC content compared to their male counterparts. You’re in good hands—we’ve outlined everything you need to know about identifying female and male marijuana plants, so you can easily make the most out of your crop at home.

Look for thicker, sturdier stalks with fewer leaves on male plants. A male plant, compared to a female plant of the same strain, generally has a thicker stalk. That is because it gets taller than female plants and needs to be able to support the weight. They also have fewer leaves than female plants. [1] X Research source

  • You need to check every plant to determine if it is male or female, as one rogue male can wreck your harvest.
  • In general, male plants show their sex 7-10 days (indoor) or 3 weeks (outdoor) before female plants.
  • If you’re trying to create new plants or reproduce, you need to leave these balls undisturbed.
  • Female plants will have these bulbs too, but will also have long, translucent hairs on them. If you only see 1-2 on a plant, wait and see if more develop before cutting them.
  • “Hermies” are generally undesirable plants, and they can ruin a small crop with their pollen if you’re not careful.

Throw out or remove male plants unless you specifically want seeds. Once you’ve determined a plant is male, you need to get rid of it or it will ruin your crop. Do not try and remove the buds by hand, as missing even a few will significantly decrease your crop. While most growers simply throw the plants out, a few keep them around for breeding purposes. If you do, put them in a separate room from the females, and make sure you don’t track pollen in from the male room to the female room on your clothes or hands. [4] X Research source www.theweedblog.com/sexing-your-outdoor-marijuana-plants/

  • You can purchase “feminized” seeds as well, which usually create close to 100% female plants. However, there are occasional errors, and you should still keep a close eye on your plants to make sure there are no rogue males. [5] X Research source www.theweedblog.com/sexing-your-outdoor-marijuana-plants/
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Note fuller bodies of leaves, when compared to males, on a grown female plant. If you’re trying to sex mature plants, one of the easiest indicators is how bushy they get. Male plants have thicker, sturdier stalks and very few leaves. A female of the same strain will be shorter and bushier, with more leaves, especially near the top.

  • Male plants will have the small buds (pollen sacs) but will not have the associated hair growing out of it.
  • Plants can grow both pollen sacs and pistils. If it does, it is hermaphroditic and should be treated like a male.

Separate your females from any males, as only females create buds. Only female plants will produce enough THC to be used as medicine, but they won’t create much if they become fertilized. The pistil is meant to attract pollen. If it gets it, it will create a seed, and all the plants energy and nutrients will be spent making seeds, not making big, THC-full buds. Your female plants are the only ones that will produce a crop, but only if they stay away from the males.

In general it’s not a good idea, because you can bring bugs and other things into your house, but as long as it’s not being kept around indoor plants, it should work. Just make sure to keep an eye on the plant and give it plenty of fresh air, as that is likely what it is used to. Keep in mind that the sun is the best grow light, though, so you should leave it outdoors if you can!

It needs a light cycle with a minimum of 12 hours of uninterrupted, complete darkness every day to trigger and maintain flowering.

Be grateful, because you probably have female plants. Female plants are the only plants that produce buds.

I have a 6 month old indoor plant but it is not budding or showing any male gender. The plant stands about 51 inches tall; it appears to be healthy, very green, most of the nodes are standing up instead of sagging. What could be the problem?

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Plants usually need around 12 hours of darkness to bud. That is why they bud at the end of the summer. If you have these indoors where they get light for more than 12 hours, that is your problem.

Cut the smallest branch and make sure it’s one of the young ones that will be flowering. This is called cloning.

A plant with 3 leaves is ruderalis, a wild outdoor variety. There are 5 types: indica, sativa, ruderalis, Australian bastard weed, and duck’s foot.

Many advise metal halide for vegetation and high pressure sodium for flowering. If your want to use blue light for vegetation, use 6500 k (cool white) CFL because you can keep them close and avoid stretch. HPS is fine for the entire grow because the lack of blue keeps them short.

Let the soil dry out before watering again. Cannabis plants are resilient and will usually recuperate from over-watering.

Check frequently once your plants have hit the 6-week mark — you want to know you plant’s sex as soon as you can.

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  1. ↑http://www.marijuanaseedbanks.com/female_and_male_marijuana_plants.html
  2. ↑http://www.theweedblog.com/sexing-your-outdoor-marijuana-plants/
  3. ↑http://www.growweedeasy.com/marijuana-boy-girl
  4. ↑ www.theweedblog.com/sexing-your-outdoor-marijuana-plants/
  5. ↑ www.theweedblog.com/sexing-your-outdoor-marijuana-plants/

About This Article

wikiHow is a “wiki,” similar to Wikipedia, which means that many of our articles are co-written by multiple authors. To create this article, 23 people, some anonymous, worked to edit and improve it over time. This article has been viewed 2,340,391 times.

If you’re growing marijuana plants, it’s important to be able to tell male and female plants apart, since only the females produce the buds that contain high concentrations of THC. To identify male and female marijuana plants, make sure they’ve been growing for at least 6 weeks, since both types of plant look the same in their early stages. Then, look for male plants to have thicker stalks and fewer leaves than their female counterparts. You can also tell if a plant is male by checking for little flowers or bulbs at the joints of the stalk and branches. By contrast, you’ll see small, translucent hairs on the same areas of a female plant. Once you’ve identified that a plant is male, remove it from your growing area to prevent it from pollinating the female plants, which will result in your THC harvest being reduced. For tips on what to do with plants that have both male and female organs, read on!

Difference Between Male and Female Weed Seeds

Plants, like animals, have male and female varieties. The male plants produce pollen which pollinates the flowers of female plants. Flowers that have been pollinated produce seeds. Marijuana, or weed plants, are also either male or female.

Female marijuana weed plants that have not been pollinated are called “sinsemilla” or “without seeds.” The flowers are allowed to grow and develop to produce the psychoactive chemical tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

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Weed seeds and plants are cultivated for this chemical. Since only the female weed seeds produce it, growers only cultivate male weed seeds for breeding otherwise they are harvested early to keep them from pollinating the female weed plants.

The sex of the male weed seeds or plants can be determined three weeks before the female weed seeds or plants which are planted at the same time. This is convenient since male weed seeds or plants must be harvested before they can pollinate the female seeds or plants and block their growth.

Male weed seeds or plants grow vertically and do not have as many branches and leaves as the female weed seeds or plants. This causes them to look frail and unhealthy. Instead of flowers they develop small buds that look like balls. These characteristic abnormal growths usually appear between the third and fourth internodes of the main stem of the plant. This is manifested at the start of the development of a male weed seed or plant’s sexual identity.

When female weed seeds or plants start to flower, hairs develop in abundance at the ends of their ramifications. This is not present in male weed seeds or plants. Female weed seeds or plants also develop V-shaped pistils at their flowering stage.

Some weed seeds also develop the sexual organs of the opposite sex. These are called hermaphrodites or “hermies.” Hermaphrodite female weed seeds develop staminate flowers or flowers that have stamens instead of pistils.

Hermaphrodite male weed seeds are not very common since they are not allowed to grow up to their point of ripening when the pistils show. It is important to watch out for hermaphrodites since they can release pollen that can ruin the crop.

They can pollinate themselves as well as the other female weed plants. They tend to pass on their sexual dispositions to their offspring so they are best eradicated. The sex of weed plants can be affected by many factors. Environmental conditions, weed seed age, lunar stages, and chemicals are known to influence the sex of the plants.

1.Female weed seeds or plants produce THC while male weed seeds or plants do not.
2.Female weed seeds or plants produce flowers while male weed seeds or plants produce small buds that look like balls.
3.Female weed seeds or plants develop V-shaped pistils at the start of their flowering stage while male weed seeds or plants do not.
4.Hairs appear on the ramifications of female weed seeds or plants which are absent in male weed seeds or plants.