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cannabis heat stress

Cannabis heat stress

When your cannabis plants are sick and stressed, it’s important to immediately identify the problem. That’s when the real process of reviving your cannabis begins. Here’s what to do to help your plants recover and thrive after a major setback.

When you grow indoors with your lights on a timer, you can also cut down on the daily light hours your plants receive. When you reduce the light hours for the vegetative phase to only 17 or 16 a day, this will give your plants more time to “rest” and recover.
Repotting your cannabis plants into new, larger containers with fresh soil can also help bring them back to life. Choose a container that has plenty of room for the roots to grow. If your plant is severely damaged due to overwatering (root rot) or various fungi, consider trimming its foliage. When the roots have fewer leaves to support, they can recover faster.

If your plant appears to be dying or suffering hard, it is unlikely that a minor issue is occurring. Most of the time, a rapid descent in the health of your plant signals a fundamental issue or invasion. This can involve problems with environmental conditions, microscopic infestations, and other culprits.
For those growing in soil, compost teas are an excellent supplement to support the recovery of sick and stressed plants. Compost teas can make your plants grow faster and more robust, making them less susceptible to diseases and deficiencies. Some cultivators make their own compost teas at home, although they can also be purchased at most well-sorted grow stores.
Despite cannabis loves plenty of light and warm temperatures, if you grow outdoors in the summer, heat stress and excessive sun can be a problem, especially for plants recovering from illness. If you have your plants in pots and they look stressed from too much heat, move them to a shadier location. Less heat and direct sun will make it easier for sick plants to get back up to strength.
In terms of keeping the pests away, there are natural insecticides like neem oil that can be highly effective. You can even use it as a foliar spray, applying it to your leaves every 2 or 3 weeks. However, be careful during the flowering phase as you do not want the overbearing taste of neem oil on your buds! For fungus gnats, you can also set up yellow sticky traps, which will catch most of them.
There are certain supplements you can give to your sick plants to reduce stress, support their development, and increase their resistance.

To flush your plants, drench the growing medium with water numerous times. It should be ample enough that liquid comes out from the bottom of the container each time. For example, if you grow in 7l pots, flush your plants with 14l of water. When you grow in soil, your water should have a pH of about 6.5pH. After the flush, you can begin giving nutrients again, starting with ½ or ¾-strength doses. You can slowly work your way up from here to avoid putting plants under any additional stress.

In this guide, you'll learn how to help revive your sick and stressed cannabis plants after infestations, nutrient deficiencies, and much more!

Cannabis heat stress

If there is very low humidity in your grow room, or your local climate is very arid, cannabis plants are more prone to developing “cupped” leaves from the heat. Even though the heat might not appear to be very harsh, when combined with low-humidity, the two can wreak havoc on your plants. Especially when you want to keep your plants in low humidity to combat top rot, keep a very close eye on your leaves’ edges.

Outdoor growing may leave you with fewer options concerning temperature regulation, but there are still tactics that can be used to help your plants survive blistering temperatures. The root system appears to be very helpful in preventing heat damage to the upper regions of your cannabis plants. A frequent and thorough watering schedule, if possible adjusted to the current weather forecast, is a good way of keeping your plant’s root system cool. Another option is to dig a hole in the ground (about as deep as the height of your pots) and put the plant, including the pot, in there. The cooler temperature from the ground should take some of the heat off of your plants.
There are several ways to help your plants withstand higher temperatures or recover from past heat damage. The availability of solutions, however mostly depends on the environment that you are growing in. The most universal solution is to make sure you have adequate temperature monitors in place. These help to detect if your grow lights are too close or if the sun might be too intense for your plants on certain days.

This last tip also applies to outdoor growers, seeing as it helps with situations in which the damage has already been done and you want to help your plants recover: seaweed kelp extract. It comes as a liquid fertiliser and in addition to containing nutrients and minerals, it contains cytokinins, which are highly beneficial in reducing stress. This extract helps your plants recover from heat stress and even has the power to help protect them more effectively in the event of future cases.
Using pots that insulate can also help a great deal in preventing heat stress or damage. Planting pots made out of ceramic help a lot with insulation and keep the heat out. If insulation is still not enough of a measure to keep your plants safe from the heat, consider moving the potted plants to a shaded area. Putting up an old sheet or tarp takes away most of the direct heat.
Flowering plants are even more susceptible to heat stress. If too many leaves become damaged by overheating, the cannabis plant will respond by growing buds with lower potential. This abnormal formation of buds can manifest in what is known as “foxtailing,” which usually occurs in buds closest to your grow light.
Heat stress solutions for indoor growing mostly revolve around increasing the air circulation inside your grow space. Consider increasing the distance between your plants and the light source. If this is not possible, an oscillating fan that blows over the top of your plants might be a good alternative. The fan ensures that the heat is dispersed more evenly across the grow space.
There are several signs that indicate your plants are suffering from heat stress. First, the ends of leaves will start to curl up – a phenomenon easily and often confused with overfeeding. The main difference between heat stress and overfeeding is that with the former, the entire sides of the leaf will curl up, not just the ends. Also unlike overfeeding, leaf ends will not become “burned” by nutrients. Therefore, be on the lookout for curling leaves unaccompanied by other overfeeding symptoms.

The buds may also display new growth at a much higher rate toward the top of the bud than on the bottom. These newly formed pistils are usually white and give the appearance that the bud is not ready for harvest. If this happens, it is a telltale sign of overheated cannabis plants. Upon deciding when to harvest your plants, pay attention to the lower end of the buds as this will give you the best indication of their actual maturity.

Come and see how you can make sure that heat works to your marijuana plant's advantage and does not cause irrevocable stress or damage to precious buds.