Can Dogs Take Trazodone And CBD Oil

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Being a dog owner isn’t always peachy keen. In fact, sometimes it’s thunder and lightning storms and anxiety attacks……literally. As much as most of us wish our four-legged best friends could talk, this just isn’t the case. When your pup wakes up to scary, loud noises at three in the morning, it’s hard to calm him/h Bailey, a nervous basset-hound mix who lives in Shaw, knows a thing or two about wellness trends. She eats chicken with fresh apples and carrots that her owner meal-preps for her every week. She kayaks. She sometimes uses a white-noise machine to fall asleep. Most recently, she has tapped into the reigning wellness craze: CBD

Can Dogs Take Trazodone And CBD Oil

Being a dog owner isn’t always peachy keen. In fact, sometimes it’s thunder and lightning storms and anxiety attacks…. literally. As much as most of us wish our four-legged best friends could talk, this just isn’t the case.

When your pup wakes up to scary, loud noises at three in the morning, it’s hard to calm him/her down. While on this topic, fireworks can come out of nowhere for a pup who doesn’t quite understand the concept of July 4th or New Years Eve too.

Loud noises can cause a pup anxiety, it can also cause dangerous situations such as your dog getting scared, running away, or even hurting themselves in the act. Your vet may prescribe anti-anxiety medication to ease your pup’s fear – is it worth it?

While easing your anxious pup, these medications may cause adverse reactions that are maybe worse than hearing fireworks? Yikes. Do you have other options? In this article, we hope to help answer these questions you have and any concerns regarding your pup and those celebratory fireworks.

Fireworks: A Potential Recipe for Disaster

If you’ve ever witnessed a dog become scared from a loud noise, you know how impossible it is to safely calm them down.

Your dog will typically just attempt to escape the situation, running until their legs can’t anymore.

Anxiety Medication

Your vet may prescribe an anti-anxiety medication, if your pup suffers from stress associated with loud noises. We want pet owners to be aware of these medications, what they aim to achieve, and their potential side effects.

The more you know, the better you can make the best decision possible for your scared pup.

Why Trazodone for Your Dog

Trazodone is a medication typically prescribed to humans as an antidepressant. However, you trazodone is also a medication for dogs. It’s typically seen in the brand names Leptro and Desyrel.

Trazodone for dogs is used as an anti-anxiety medication for the treatment of numerous anxieties including separation anxiety and anxiety provoked by loud sounds. Trazodone inhibits activity at specific serotonin receptor sites in the brain and changes the way the brain receives messages.

Trazodone Side Effects

Sounds like a safe bet for your anxious pet, right? Well, there are some not so great potential side effects of this medication.

  • Sedation
  • Diarrhea
  • Panting
  • Vomiting
  • Hyperactivity
  • Restlessness
  • Agitation
  • Lethargy

You can quickly see numerous of the adverse reactions resemble an anxiety attack. So what’s the point? Giving your pup harsh medication only for it to potentially create more problems doesn’t make much sense.

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What is Sileo for Dogs

Sileo is the first and only FDA-approved drug that is designed to treat loud noise anxiety in dogs. Because so many dogs experience anxiety and fear with loud noises, scientists created a medication specifically for the condition. This medication aims to relieve the symptoms of stress associated with those loud noises.

Side Effects of Sileo

Sileo has been advertised to calm your pup without sedation but we can’t ignore dexmedetomidine hydrochloride (the main ingredient). This ingredient is used for heavy sedation. Your pup may also have side effects like abnormally low blood pressure, slow heart action, and sinoatrial arrest.

Unfortunately, there’s more. A sinoatrial arrest can also lead to cardiac arrest, which can lead to death.

Acepromazine for Dogs

Many dogs have noise phobias associated with fireworks, sadly. Many of these dogs are being prescribed a drug called Acepromazine, also known as “Ace”.

This medication is an effective sedative that is used before anesthesia in dogs prior to surgery. But for firework disturbances in your pup, this “Ace” can be very dangerous.

“Ace” Side Effects

  • Seizures
  • Low body temperature
  • Pink-colored urine
  • Hypotension

Valium for your Dog

Valium is often prescribed to humans for anxiety. However, scientists have developed a dosage of valium that your vet may prescribe to ease stress and anxiety associated with loud noises.

Valium Side Effects

  • Impaired coordination
  • Increased appetite
  • Diarrhea
  • Loss of appetite
  • Fatigue
  • Behavioral changes

Dramamine for Dogs

There are several medications that help ease symptoms associated with stress and anxiety. For example, Dramamine can help with your pup’s motion sickness. It’s an anti-nausea medication, not an anti-anxiety medication. Therefore, your beloved doggo may not be vomiting, but still having high levels of stress.

Your Dog is Terrified: What to Do

Frantically, you’re wondering, what are your options?

Be Prepared

Luckily, we are able to plan ahead, knowing that we know when fireworks typically set off on the same two holidays every year (4th of July and NYE). part of being prepared is understanding symptoms of panic in dogs.

  • Trembling, shaking, hiding, pacing, seeking comfort, erratic behavior
  • Urination, salivation, easily spooked

Be Present

If there’s no way for you to be home with your pup on these loud noise holidays, consider taking your pup to a friend’s place or somewhere that he/she is familiar with and feels safe at.

Stay Calm

Your dog can sense your energy. It’s super important to stay calm. Dogs look to their pack leader (aka you) for social cues.

Desensitize

For weeks leading up to the “big day” holiday, pet owners will desensitize their dogs by playing youtube videos of fireworks. Start off quietly and don’t make a big deal of the fireworks playing in the background. Increasing the volume of videos over time will help reprogram the dog’s mind to not fear the unknown.

How to Calm Your Pup Down Naturally

There are safe and effective ways to naturally calm your anxious pup (with virtually no side effects)!

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1. CBD Oil

Studies suggest that CBD oil for your dogs promotes relaxation.

CBD oil can be squirted directly into your pup’s mouth or even mixed into their food.

Here, at Petly CBD, our Pet Hemp Oil is a great choice for your anxious pup! This natural product combines only two natural compounds that support canine health—broad-spectrum hemp extract and MCT coconut oil.

2. CBD Pet Chews

We know some dogs prefer chews over treats. Look no further than these Pet Hemp CBD Dog Treats . Our proprietary veterinarian formulated soft chews are carefully crafted ensuring every ingredient is of the highest quality, and always free of preservatives and pesticides. These tantalizing beef flavored CBD treats not only host a wealth of health benefits, but will have your pup begging for more.

We are pleased that so many of you are finding all-natural, non-toxic results from the powerful CBD herb.

Trazodone for Dogs: Final Thoughts

You want your pup to understand they are safe. Everything is going to be okay and the loud noises will be over soon. Sometimes, it’s just not possible to get these messages across to your pup. Luckily, as pet owners, we can be prepared, present, calm and confident, and implement natural remedies to ensure our pup is comforted and not alone.

Dog Owners Are Using CBD to Help Their Pets’ Anxiety, Seizures, and Even Cancer

Bailey, a nervous basset-hound mix who lives in Shaw, knows a thing or two about wellness trends. She eats chicken with fresh apples and carrots that her owner meal-preps for her every week. She kayaks. She sometimes uses a white-noise machine to fall asleep. Most recently, she has tapped into the reigning wellness craze: CBD oil.

Previously, the vet recommended Trazodone, a prescription sedative, to treat Bailey’s nervous shedding and shaking. But the side effects made her owner, Sandy Guillermo, uncomfortable. “You could see that she was high,” says Guillermo, an administrative assistant. “Completely drugged up.” So for the past year, Guillermo has fed Bailey a daily CBD chewable along with multivitamins and turmeric tablets. As a result, she says Bailey has mellowed out dramatically. Even the Fourth of July—which used to terrify the dog—didn’t rattle her too badly.

Guillermo has tried CBD herself, but the idea to give it to Bailey came from the DC Single Dog Parents group she founded. Other members had been talking about using it for their pets. In fact, it has lately become one of the hottest topics among doting Washington dog owners—which isn’t so surprising. Like veganism or intermittent fasting, CBD is the kind of thing that can turn fans into proselytizers. Never mind that there isn’t much science yet to back them up.

Take Navy, a Loudoun County corgi whose raw diet and travel tips are chronicled on the “dog-friendly lifestyle blog” Navy Corgi and whose Instagram account has nearly 80,000 followers. Her owner, Alex, says the blog’s most read post is not about doggy DNA testing or subscription toy boxes—it’s about Navy’s experience using CBD for separation anxiety. Since the post, Alex has fielded sponsorship opportunities for pet CBD products. Though she’s been offered up to $1,500 for a single post, Alex has accepted only free treats (and no money) from the brand that she knows has actually helped her dog. Before, when Navy was alone in a strange setting such as a hotel, she would scratch the walls and yap. Now if Alex gives her one of the treats before she leaves, she says Navy just goes to sleep.

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Yet even as positive anecdotal evidence mounts, there’s no conclusive proof that CBD works in pets. After the 2018 Farm Bill lessened restrictions on CBD—a compound derived from hemp that can be soothing but, unlike marijuana, doesn’t get you high—the marketplace flooded with products for both people and animals. The Dupont pet boutique Doggy Style started carrying CBD treats and balms last year, and owner Krista Heinz says they’ve quickly become popular. District Hemp Botanicals owner Barbara Biddle says pet treats and oils are some of her bestsellers—one of her clients uses the oil for her rescue chicken’s injured leg.

Still, the few studies on CBD and pets end with “additional research is warranted.” The FDA also hasn’t approved a single CBD product for animals. Which is why DC veterinarian Wendy Knight, co-owner of CityPaws Animal Hospital, isn’t ready to recommend it to patients. “The first oath that we take is to do no harm,” says Knight. “We don’t have a guideline for how much to give, [for] what’s appropriate.”

Even so, a lot of dog owners are using CBD to treat conditions much more serious than jittery nerves. Last year, after Bridget Passarelli discovered that her Chihuahua, Lola, was having seizures, she spent $2,000 on CAT scans, neurologist visits, and medications. She stumbled on CBD when she began researching seizure treatments for humans. Now when Lola begins to lick her lips and cough—signs that a seizure is imminent—Passarelli feeds her four peanut-butter-flavored drops. She credits the CBD for reducing the frequency of Lola’s seizures from weekly to monthly and for decreasing their severity.

Wheaten terrier Mac also seemingly had a turnaround after starting a CBD regimen. He was diagnosed with a tumor on his spleen at age 13, and his vet at Falls Church Animal Hospital recommended CBD oil. Weeks earlier, Mac’s owner, Meredith Jacobs, had been on the floor begging him to eat roast chicken, and Mac hadn’t been able to walk around the block. But within 48 hours of taking CBD drops, Jacobs says the dog’s appetite and energy rebounded.

Mac died in June, two years after his vet predicted he would survive two months. Even without medical proof that the drops extended her dog’s life, Jacobs says, “I definitely became the neighborhood spokesperson for CBD.”

This article appears in the March 2020 issue of Washingtonian.

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