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barneys packs

Barneys packs

Moose or caribou antlers should be strapped onto the pack upside-down, Begin by laying the skull plate atop the bag, and bringing the top flap over the top of the skull plate, cinching it down securely. Ensure that the antler points are facing away from the frame, to prevent them from getting snagged on brush and tree limbs.

Hunters in need of a pack for packing out heavy loads of meat, hides and gear need a heavy-duty external-frame pack that’s rugged enough to handle big loads, yet comfortable enough to “wear all day”. Barney’s Sport Chalet of Anchorage has long been an innovator in gear design and one of their signature products is their “Moose Pack”.
Beware of inferior pack and frame systems that look similar to the Barney’s Moose Pack! There are several such packs on the market, and they are not up to the tough, rugged standards you need in a pack designed for carrying heavy loads of meat and gear. Cheaper bags are easily torn, and seams will separate. Inferior frames are easilyn bent and rendered useless. Spend the money on good-quality gear and it will last your lifetime.

The frame’s riser bar tends to hang up on limbs if you’re moving through heavy alders, hence the name “alder hanger). Hunters intending to pack through heavy brush should consider removing this bar at the beginning of their hunt.
Although the Moose Pack is waterproof and can be washed with normal detergent, most hunters want to keep blood out of it while packing meat. Use an unscented trash compactor bag for a pack liner when packing meat. Compactor bags are heavy-duty and will handle multiple loads, and the plastic bag allows the quarter to slide into the bag with ease.
The Moose Pack is available only in camouflage.
The proof of the Moose Pack’s reliability is the fact that most commercial hunting guides in Alaska use it. Many Moose Packs have been in use for over 20 years, with no failures of any kind. One guide reports that he has packed thousands of pounds of meat, rafts and gear in his Moose Pack and never had a failure. No other brand of pack in Alaska has this kind of longevity or track record.
The main bag has no dividers in it, and is roomy enough to accommodate large moose quarters or bulky gear. Simply drop the quarter into the bag, and cinch the cross-straps, top opening draw cord, and top flap down snugly and you’re good to go.

One of the best things about this frame is its adjustability. The strap system can be made to fit literally any hunter’s body size, by simply removing the pins in the appropriate locations and repositioning them. It can be done easily in the field in just a few minutes. The straps are padded and contoured to fit your body; the shoulder straps have a chest strap to keep them from slipping off your shoulders, and they are adjustable for height and shoulder span. The padded, non-skid waist belt has tilt, width, and girth adjustments. Most of the major adjustments can be made on the fly as you are packing, and there are dozens of combinations when it comes to fine-tuning the system to fit your body.

Hunters in need of a pack for packing out heavy loads of meat, hides and gear need a heavy-duty external-frame pack that’s rugged enough to handle big loads, yet comfortable enough to wear all day. Barney’s Sport Chalet of Anchorage has long been an innovator in gear design and one of their signature products is their Moose Pack.

I bought this pack and the Hunter bag a couple of years ago after my old pack broke. Yes, it is a more expensive pack but the quality of the frame and bag is first rate. Should last me for years.

  • best pack for hauling out heavy loads

Zachary Royce
April 22, 2004

average rating
Jerry 58 +95
January 23, 2011 | updated May 12, 2012
As for the pack, I bought a Super Moose pack from Barneys. Barneys makes other, more expensive packs with larger capacity and more pockets, but the Super Moose was plenty for me. It is only available right now (4/04) in a real-tree (i.e. leaves, branches, tree trunk) camo design that looks similar in color and texture/breakup to the standard military Woodland Camo (Barney’s has dark green, light and other browns, black, greys) from 10 meters out. It cost $169, more than you would pay for a Camp Trails Moose III or a Cabellas pack, but is clearly of sturdier construction. 1000D Cordura nylon vs. the 420D nylon of the other packs. Double-stitching everywhere, Kevlar-thread reinforcment where the webbing attaches to the pack. HUGE metal zippers on plastic runners. Similar shape to Camp Trails Moose III (about 30″h x 14″w x 8.5″d main compartment with two large side compartments) but with additional large compartments on front and on flap. Also the side compartments are stitched remotely to the main compartment, so that tube-shaped compartments are formed between the two, for stashing a ground mat, rifle, etc. Altogether, not including the tube space, I calculated roughly 5100 cubic inches of interior capacity. Webbing is placed where necessary on the pack to compress the various compartments, both side, tube and main. In short, the pack is huge, elegantly simple, well constructed, and tough as hell. In my opinion, it is worth the extra $50-$100. Also, the people I spoke with at Barney’s–Bob, Paul and an older woman who referred to herself as the “mother of the store” and remarked that one of her grandchildren had the same name–were all very helpful and friendly over the phone. Their website is a bit clunky though, which is not surprising given that this is a small shop, and not a big company.
It will haul an amazing load. Packed out a quarter last year and it wasn’t that bad. The only way it could have been better is if my boys would have hauled the whole moose by themselves.
Source: bought it new
Price Paid: $600

Barney’s Sports Chalet (barneyssports.com) makes (in USA) bags and frames (sold seperately) which are interchangeable with Camp Trails’ Moose/Freighter Frame and Cabella’s Alaska line. Both their frame and their bags are MUCH more expensive than either Cabellas or Camp Trails, but they have a cult reputation for MUCH better build quality among Alaskan hunters and guides, who have to haul out moose quarters weighing 165 lbs or more. The Barney’s frame was too expensive for me–I purchased a Cabella’s Alaskan Guide frame, which is considerably more robust than the Camp Trails Freighter Frame, and seems more than sufficient for my needs.

I bought this pack and the Hunter bag a couple of years ago after my old pack broke. Yes, it is a more expensive pack but the quality of the frame and bag is first rate.