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autoflower clones

Autoflower clones
So, why can’t I simply sow seeds of the mother plant to replicate it, you ask? Well, although planting seeds can give you some of the genetics of the parent plant, cloning guarantees that you get the exact replica with absolutely no changes.
It’s not impossible to clone autoflowering strains. They are normal plants just like other cannabis plants. But, the problem is that growers are rarely successful in cloning them. This is because of the way autoflowers grow.
Once a cutting is taken from the mother plant, it is dipped in a rooting hormone powder or solution. The cutting is then placed in a seedling tray with some soil. It’s important to cover the cuttings with some sort of a dome so that it develops roots. Don’t place them in complete darkness, though. Partial light is best for them to get some roots.

  • You get more plants without having to spend money on seeds
  • You get the exact genetics of your favorite strains
  • You can produce large quantities of plants and thus increase yields
  • You can eliminate male plants by cloning only female plants

Photoperiod strains start flowering when they get 12 hours of darkness, so make sure that it gets proper lighting to prevent flowering. You can allow the mother plant to grow and flower if you don’t need any more cuttings. However, if you wish to get more, it can continue to grow in the vegetative stage as long as you want more clones.
In this process, you’ll be left with a small plant that has no time to develop proper roots either. With autoflowers, timing is everything, and since cloning requires time, it’s not possible to clone autoflowers.
All this process takes time, though. Photoperiod strains will start flowering only when they get 12 hours of darkness, just like in the wild. When cannabis plants realize that the periods of darkness are increasing, they start flowering. Obviously, you can manipulate the plant to grow as long as you want by providing 18 hours of light.
It will put all its energy into growing beautiful buds and cloning at this stage will produce a plant that won’t have enough time to grow. Due to inadequate growth, the plant will produce very few buds. And, the result will be a small, stunted plant with almost no yield.
With a photoperiod strain, you simply wait until the plant grows a bit. After you sow the seed, you need to wait at least 3-4 weeks for the seedling to do its thing. The plant must have a few branches that can develop into other plants on their own. At this point, use a sharp pair of scissors to take a cutting.
Growing cannabis is extremely interesting because you can experiment in several ways to get the desired outcome. Over the years, cannabis growers have come up w
Autoflower clones
It’s often said that autoflowering cannabis strains cannot be cloned. Considering that cloning is an easy and economically efficient way to grow weed, this would be a real shame. So, is this claim true or false?
This means that cloning is an excellent way for cannabis growers to preserve the genetics from a particular strain that they adore. The new clone will share all of the original characteristics, from the way it tastes to the high that it produces.
This distinction is largely due to evolutionary differences. Autoflowering strains are known to have evolved in northern regions of the world where there is much less sunlight throughout the year. This led them to develop the ability to flower automatically over certain periods of time.
Photoperiodic strains evolved closer to the equator. When grown indoors, they require a light cycle change which simulates the approaching autumn and encourages them to march towards flowering and seeding before the weather becomes too harsh for them to continue to survive.
The cutting will follow the same genetic timeline as the mother and will continue approaching the flowering stage, regardless of its size and development. In the case of autoflowering strains, this usually results in small and underdeveloped specimens with minimal yields to offer.
Photoperiodic varieties are far superior when it comes to cloning. If the cutting is taken during the vegetative phase and the light cycle remains the same, it will have the chance to grow and flourish within the vegetative phase. Only when the plant has reached an optimal size will the grower elect to shift the light cycle and initiate the flowering stage.
Cloning a cannabis plant is an extremely interesting process. It involves taking a cutting from an already established “mother” plant, and using this cutting to generate an entirely new and independent plant. What’s more, the new plant will share identical genetics to the mother that it was cloned from.
Cloning cannabis plants is also economically appealing to many growers. It means that they don’t have to keep buying seeds in order to grow the exact same strain; instead, they can simply take a cutting from the prized plant within their crop and create a homogeneous copy. With all these benefits, it might seem as though cloning should be a technique that all growers use, all of the time. However, the method does indeed have its limitations.
One significant limitation is that autoflowering strains of cannabis are quite difficult, though not impossible, to clone successfully. Considering that autoflowering varieties have some massive advantages over traditional strains, such as compact sizes and rapid growth time, this may put many cultivators off from cloning altogether.
Many within the cannabis community claim that autoflowering varieties of the plant cannot be cloned. Is this just a myth or a fact?