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8 miles high

8 miles high
Roger McGuinn’s trademark jangly Rickenbacker was pressed into service to make a sitar-like sound instead. But if you listen to his playing, the essence of the sitar is definitely there and “Eight Miles High” played its part in popularising that style of playing across the musical spectrum in the years to follow…both with and without the actual instrument itself.
Soon, psychedelia would be everywhere. Flower Power would be in full swing. Long haired, kaftan-wearing, vaguely spaced-out people would start a movement in an inexpensive district of San Francisco which would spread across the world.
And the sitar makes an appearance too…metaphorically, if not literally. Ravi Shankar had also been a staple on the tour bus, so it seemed natural to get a dose of Eastern mysticism on the record too.

Eight miles high, and when you touch down
You’ll find that it’s stranger than known
Signs in the street that say where you’re going
Are somewhere just being their own

In fairness to those radio stations, that assumption was probably correct. Byrds front-man Roger McGuinn was the “McGuinn” referred to in the Mamas and Papas “Creeque Alley” as “McGuinn and McGuire, just a-getting higher/ In LA you know where that’s at”.
The Doors, the Yardbirds, Jefferson Airplane, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, Traffic and many, many more took the psychedelic sound head on and developed their own unique take on that musical style.
There’s some truth in that. The Byrds did come to the UK on an aeroplane for their 1965 tour, but at the time, commercial airlines flew at about six miles high, not eight. Despite the band’s claims that “eight miles high” was just a bit of artistic licence to make the lyrics sound better, US radio stations didn’t completely buy the explanation.
Nowadays when The Byrds are mentioned, it’s usually in terms of their contribution to popularising 1960s folk songs with a pop audience.
But as I don’t remember 1965, I don’t know if the BBC played it or not. However I don’t ever recall hearing “Eight Miles High” on the radio in later years, even on oldies radio. In fact, I didn’t know the song even existed until some time in the late 1990s when that new invention called “the internet” allowed people to learn about topics they’d couldn’t easily find out about before the birth of the information superhighway.
Nowadays when The Byrds are mentioned, it’s usually in terms of their contribution to popularising 1960s folk songs with a pop audience. But The Byrds did so much more…
The song “Eight Miles High” was written by the legendary Byrds as they were flying to London totally stoned and spaced out. The Byrds became part of the movement of psychedelic rock. Their rapidly changing avantgarde style birthed several musical trends from folk-rock, space-rock, psychedelic-rock to country-rock, reflecting the awesome metamorphosis the counterculture in the 1960’s was undergoing. Roger McGuinn’s 12-string solo in Eight Miles High is a milestone in rock history and has elements of both John Coltrane’s modal jazz innovations and the drone of an Indian raga; a tonal adventure that foresaw the trend of fusion and world music two decades later. David Crosby left the band in 1968 and became part of the famed Crosby, Stills and Nash group, which wrote it’s own transformative chapter in music history. With this humble tribute we wish to express our thanks to all Flower Children for their courage to explore new frontiers of consciousness and for their far-out music that continues to touch our hearts.
Good potential against lethargy & depression; stimulates appetite.
A sweet-fruity melange of strawberry and melon; hash-candy; piney; minty.
400-450 gr/m2; 800-1000 gr. per plant outdoor in the ground.

This is a fragrant, uplifting sativa that delivers quality harvests indoor & outdoor. Special attention was devoted to making this variety a low-maintenance plant that finishes by mid-October in northern climates. Flowering sets in quickly with most plants sexing within one week of switching to 12/12. Another positive feature is the fast and profuse resin production during early flowering that rewards your efforts right from the start. 8 Miles High has proven to be very reliable under various environmental stress factors such as abrupt changes in light and temperature. Plants can therefore be moved from indoor and planted out with no adverse effects. This strain is easy to grow and has no special requirements. It has shown good mould resistance and grows well in soil with no extra feeding*, making it a good choice for growers with little experience or not much time on their hands.
Choose the right Mandala strain for your location using a highly detailed climate guide and special info’s.
1st week Oct. (south), mid October (north).
The smoke has a fresh minty taste and lingering sweetness to it. 8 Miles High lifts off straight to the head and triggers a lot of cerebral activity with flashes of insights and long episodes of trippy visuals when you close your eyes and switch to auto pilot. This is a functional daytime smoke, or a wake-up call to keep you on your feet partying at night. The uplifting, almost euphoric, effect sets in once you reach maximum altitude. This energetic sativa glides back down smoothly and leaves an expansive feeling behind.
A sativa-dominant high; uplifting; alert & fiery-energetic; thought provoking; trippy visuals; creative.
  This is a fragrant, uplifting sativa that delivers quality harvests indoor & outdoor. Special attention was devoted to making this variety a lo