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3 leaf cannabis

3 leaf cannabis
Effects of Cannabis Indica

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Cannabis Sativa – Image powered by Medicaljane.com
The leaves of Sativa plants are elongated and pointy. Some people have even taken to referring to it as finger-like.
Besides the appearance, the effects of Sativa are also distinct. In the past decades, one of the things that breeders focused on was to have a high THC content – these are compounds that are responsible for the psychoactive properties of the plant. As such, its effects are more potent.
Of the three families of cannabis, Ruderalis is the shortest with an average height in the range of 1 to 2-1/2 feet. It is also a bushy plant with thick stems and broad leaves.
In cultivating cannabis for use, male plants are useless. In fact, growers should discard it as soon as possible. Otherwise, it may fertilize female plants causing them to produce seeds instead of flowers.
1. Hemp Seed
Think of hybrids much like people of mixed descents.
Before going into the details, though, here are some useful background information on the different types of cannabis. Basic as it is, these are the foundation of successful cultivation.
As a beginner in growing cannabis, all the things that need to be taken into consideration can be challenging. Here are some useful background information on the different types of cannabis.
3 leaf cannabis
Whorled phyllotaxy is another common mutation, although this is less desirable as a concealment trait as the plants still definitely resemble cannabis.
The leaves of cannabis plants can be very telling. Here are some tell-tale signs of a mishap in the making that can be seen by merely inspecting the leaves:
According to the standard phyllotaxy (the arrangement of leaves on a plant stem), cannabis leaves are compound (with multiple leaflets, as opposed to simple, where a single leaf grows from the stem) and opposite decussate rather than alternate.
Although cannabis leaves are usually decussate, as the plant prepares to flower the leaves may begin to emerge in an alternate pattern. Interestingly, rejuvenated cannabis plants demonstrate alternate phyllotaxy.
Australian Bastard Cannabis is perhaps the most striking mutation yet seen in cannabis. It is believed that this mutation was first seen in escaped populations around Sydney. Breeders have also attempted to stabilise this trait … again, without commercial success.

  • Blistered, twisted, shiny “wet” looking leaves – This may be an indication of mites, which are too small to see with the naked eye. If this is the case, new leaves may grow in twisted, top leaves can droop.
  • Spotted leaves – Spotty leaves may indicate a deficiency (likely a calcium deficiency). This normally affects new leaves or parts that are actively growing.
  • Edge of leaves fading to pale yellow – This is likely a sign of magnesium deficiency.
  • Edge of leaves change to white or bright yellow – If this is seen along with the inner main part of the leaves turning purplish or dark blue, then there’s probably a copper deficiency. They may also appear shiny or start to turn under. This most often affects leaves directly in the light.
  • Curling, folding, miscolouring leaves – If leaves are too close to light or heat, they can start undergoing heat stress. This can lead to them folding up, curling down under and turning yellow or even plainly getting a burnt look to the edges.
  • New leaves grow in bright yellow – If new leaves are growing in from the get-go with a bright yellow colour, the plant may have an iron deficiency.

C. indica leaves are much wider. The largest leaves usually have fewer leaflets than the largest sativa leaves, with seven to nine leaflets. Indica leaves are commonly deep olive-green; very light green leaves are rare and often a sign of deficiency.
Opposite leaves emerge in pairs, one each side of the stem, with a clear vertical space between the leaf pairs. Decussate leaves are opposite, but each new leaf pair is at a right-angle to the last pair. Alternate leaves emerge from the stem singly, swapping sides as the vertical height increases.
There is some evidence that this phenomenon leads to vegetative growth of greatly increased vigour, although the genetic processes responsible are not fully understood. It is thought that the evolution of opposite-decussate phyllotaxy occurred comparatively recently, from an alternate-leaved ancestor, and that the genes controlling the decussate phyllotaxy ‘switch off’ around the time of inflorescence.
Cannabis leaves are so recognizable, they’re basically iconic. But what do you know about them? Learn to identify the leaves and what you can do with them.